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Wingnuts long for a nuclear holocaust

By Amanda Marcotte
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 21:09 EDT
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So this video has been making the rounds, and my initial urge was to bucket this kind of rhetoric into same right wing tendency to allow their overactive, violent, hypermasculinity-worshiping imaginations to get the better of them. Which it totally is in no small part. They ache for war because of the drama, which makes them feel alive and important. It’s not a coincidence that there’s a huge market on the right for 9/11 memorabilia, because the day was experienced mostly as high drama, with the tragedy of it only slightly mitigating the wingnut enthusiasm. Which isn’t to downplay the danger of this at all, because as the recent spate of domestic terrorism shows, right wing fantasists can and do drift into acting out violent fantasies. And frankly, I think more would if they weren’t such cowards. Then again, if they weren’t such cowards, they might not be so drawn to violent fantasies to make them feel less cowardly.

But after watching this video a few times, I realize that what Glenn Beck and Michael Scheuer mean when they say that Osama bin Laden is their last hope as a savior, is that they mean as the savior of the Republican Party. Which I find interesting, because I’ve argued for a long time that neocons and Al Qaeda may be sworn enemies, but functionally they have a codependent relationship and really rely on each other for their own justification for existing. In that sense, they’re working together for each other. But I never thought I’d actually hear a wingnut basically come out and admit this. But there you go—they get it. Osama bin Laden is both an enemy and an ally, and they’re practically begging him to attack us so that they’re relevant.

Again, my fear here is that this sort of open longing for terrorism will help push someone, domestic or foreign, to take them up on it.

Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte is a freelance journalist born and bred in Texas, but now living in the writer reserve of Brooklyn. She focuses on feminism, national politics, and pop culture, with the order shifting depending on her mood and the state of the nation.
 
 
 
 
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