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I’m not buying this coincidence story

By Amanda Marcotte
Wednesday, July 29, 2009 22:48 EDT
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Sorry I’ve been AWOL all day. Today is a lazy day of doing nothing at Mouse HQ—sometimes, you just gotta do that. But I’m coming out of hiding a little to trot out my conspiracy theory regarding this story about a Megan Fox media blackout. (Via.) I don’t think it’s a coincidence that these men’s magazines couldn’t get enough of Fox when she was out promoting stupid, sexist, racist garbage like “Transformers 2″, but now that she’s on tap to promote her latest movie, she’s suddenly overexposed.

One of the quotes from the trailer is this exchange:

Amanda Seyfried: You’re killing people.

Megan Fox: No, I’m killing boys.

It’s written by “Juno” writer Diablo Cody and directed by “Girlfight” director Karyn Kusama. I have strong suspicions that it’s going to be a very dark horror/comedy with strong feminist sensibilities, though of course the boy-killing line is not an endorsement, because Fox is, after all, the bad guy. I suspect these facts are what’s driving the sudden distaste that sites like AskMen are developing for Fox. With this project, there’s going to be a new side of Megan Fox they’re probably going to have to ask about if she does media with them—maybe even feminist leanings? The good news is that even if I’m right, I don’t think that this squeamishness about empowered and funny ladies of Hollywood on the part of some men’s publications will do much damage to the bottom line. Cody + horror movies = a shit ton of people that will go see this on opening night, and if it’s any good, they will tell absolutely everyone. And it probably will be good. And even if men’s magazines black out coverage of it, the hook—a group of women make a horror movie that overturns many misogynist horror movie tropes—will be juicy enough that it gets plenty of love from the rest of the entertainment press.

While I’m on the subject, I thought I’d share some thoughts about Diablo Cody herself. She’s interviewed by Jill Soloway in Bust this month, and it’s therefore hilarious and you should read it. And yes, she addresses the issue of Diablo Cody backlash/haterade, joking that she’d totally be a jealous hater of herself if she wasn’t herself. And I had to check myself, because I’ve definitely fallen in the trap of hating on Cody some, especially since I thought the soft-handed portrayal of anti-choicers in “Juno” was irresponsible at best, as the recent murder of Dr. Tiller demonstrates. But I thought about it, and I can’t deny that the reason that I think Cody grates on so many people’s nerves is that we’ve internalized the idea that naked ambition in women is wrong. And Cody is aggressively ambitious. She became a stripper because she knew that means automatic book deal. She’s willing to do what it takes to get to the top and doesn’t hide it. And people hate that. Even I find it off-putting, showing how much internalized sexism works even on we loud-mouthed feminists. Even Cody doesn’t like it, and at times in the interview, I saw some troubling evidence that she tries to disconnect from her own self because of this internalized sexist weariness of being too ambitious, too organized, too damn good at what you do.

So fuck it. I love Diablo Cody. I don’t love everything about her, but since when do we need perfection from our stars in order to love them? I love that she’s challenging people’s ideas of women and ambition, challenging the idea that showing your work and ambition is unladylike. You go, girl. And I’m so going to see “Jennifer’s Body”. Also, I’m going to go ahead and go on record saying Courtney Love is kind of awesome, too, and people who think Hole’s first two albums are anything less than awesome are being assholes. Also: Yoko Ono is putting out a new album, and I bet that’s awesome, too.

Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte is a freelance journalist born and bred in Texas, but now living in the writer reserve of Brooklyn. She focuses on feminism, national politics, and pop culture, with the order shifting depending on her mood and the state of the nation.
 
 
 
 
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