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Leaked documents claim Pakistan’s ISI directing Afghan insurgency

By Agence France-Presse
Sunday, July 25, 2010 19:18 EDT
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The United States on Sunday denounced the release of documents that allegedly show Pakistan’s military spy service is guiding the Afghan insurgency, a White House official said.

“The United States strongly condemns the disclosure of classified information by individuals and organizations which could put the lives of Americans and our partners at risk, and threaten our national security,” National Security Advisor James Jones said in a statement.

“Wikileaks made no effort to contact us about these documents — the United States government learned from news organizations that these documents would be posted,” Jones said.

“These irresponsible leaks will not impact our ongoing commitment to deepen our partnerships with Afghanistan and Pakistan; to defeat our common enemies; and to support the aspirations of the Afghan and Pakistani people.”

According to the New York Times, the documents “suggest that Pakistan, an ostensible ally of the United States, allows representatives of its spy service to meet directly with the Taliban.”

Describing the talks as “secret strategy sessions,” the newspaper said they “organize networks of militant groups that fight against American soldiers in Afghanistan, and even hatch plots to assassinate Afghan leaders.”

The New York Times said it, along with the Guardian newspaper in London and the German magazine Der Spiegel, had received the leaked material several weeks ago from Wikileaks, a secretive web organization that often publishes classified material.

The new organizations agreed to publish their reports, based on 92,000 documents “used by desk officers in the Pentagon and troops in the field when they make operational plans,” on Sunday when they were to be released on the Internet.

“Most of the reports are routine, even mundane, but many add insights, texture and context to a war that has been waged for nearly nine years,” the Times said in a note to readers describing the leaks.

“Over all these documents amount to a real-time history of the war reported from one important vantage point — that of the soldiers and officers actually doing the fighting and reconstruction.”

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
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