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Ann Coulter may face voter fraud charges: report

By admin
Wednesday, October 6, 2010 22:24 EDT
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An elections commission in Connecticut will soon decide if conservative pundit Ann Coulter will face felony charges over allegations of voter fraud in the 2002 and 2004 elections, reports Brad Friedman at BradBlog.

The State Elections Enforcement Commission will vote Oct. 14 to decide whether to pursue charges based on a complaint made by Daniel Borchers, an activist with Citizens for Principled Conservatism. Borchers cited a report in the New York Daily News alleging that Coulter illegally voted in Connecticut in the 2002 and 2004 elections by way of absentee ballot from her home in New York.

BradBlog reports:

As The BRAD BLOG spent years documenting beyond a shadow of a doubt concerning her voter registration fraud and voter fraud in a different state, Florida, Ann Coulter committed third degree felony voter registration fraud, along with a first degree voter fraud misdemeanor, when she lied about her residency and then knowingly voted at the wrong polling place in Palm Beach County, FL in 2005.

Years of lying to the media, as well as election and law enforcement officials, and a last minute inappropriate intervention by a former boyfriend in the FBI, helped run out the clock on those charges. Her offenses in the Sunshine State were eventually found to be beyond the statute of limitations by the Florida State Election Commission (FSEC). The stalling by other friendly Florida agencies took so long that the FSEC didn’t receive the case until years after it had been originally reported to law enforcement by the Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections.

Friedman questions the year-and-a-half delay in bringing the charges before Connecticut’s elections commission, noting that most similar cases take “two or three months” to resolve. But “the SEEC has been extraordinarily tight-lipped about the Coulter affair for some reason,” he reports.

While cases of vote fraud of this sort are usually settled with a civil fine, Coulter could face referral to state or federal prosecution and “several years in prison,” Friedman reports.

Read the whole report here.

 
 
 
 
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