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‘I want to meet Mark Zuckerberg and thank him personally,’ Google exec tells CNN

By Stephen C. Webster
Friday, February 11, 2011 15:17 EDT
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Access to the Internet and specifically social networking site Facebook made a huge difference to Egyptians who succeeded on Friday in forcing former President Hosni Mubarak out of power. But how important was it?

“First Tunisia, now Egypt,” began CNN host Wolf Blitzer. “What’s next?”

“Ask Facebook,” answered Wael Ghonim, an Egyptian activist and the head of marketing in the Middle East and North Africa for search giant Google. “I want to meet [Facebook founder] Mark Zuckerberg and thank him personally.”

“I’m talking on behalf of Egypt,” he continued. “This revolution started online. This revolution started on Facebook. This revolution started in June 2010 when hundreds of thousands of Egyptians started collaborating content.

“We would post a video on Facebook that would be shared by 60,000 people on their walls within a few hours. I always said that if you want to liberate a society just give them the Internet.

“The reason why is the Internet will help you fight a media war, which is something the Egyptian government regime played very well in 1970, 1980, 1990, and when the Internet came along they couldn’t play it. I’m gonna talk a lot about this. I plan to write a book called ‘Revolution 2.0′ that will say everything from the start, when there was nothing, until the end, and highlight the role of social media.”

Ghoneim was arrested by Egyptian security forces during protests last week and his whereabouts was for a time unknown. While he was missing, Amnesty International said he was “facing a serious risk of torture and other ill-treatment by security forces.”

He traveled to Egypt on January 23, two days before massive nationwide rallies erupted demanding the overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak. Ghoneim was freed on Monday.

“I like to call it the Facebook Revolution but after seeing the people right now, I would say this is the Egyptian people’s revolution. It’s amazing,” he said during a speech to Egyptians in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

“I’m not a hero, you are the heroes, you’re the ones who stayed on this square,” Ghonim told the crowd as they surged around him.

This video is from CNN, broadcast Friday, Feb. 11, 2011.

With AFP.

Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster is the senior editor of Raw Story, and is based out of Austin, Texas. He previously worked as the associate editor of The Lone Star Iconoclast in Crawford, Texas, where he covered state politics and the peace movement’s resurgence at the start of the Iraq war. Webster has also contributed to publications such as True/Slant, Austin Monthly, The Dallas Business Journal, The Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Weekly, The News Connection and others. Follow him on Twitter at @StephenCWebster.
 
 
 
 
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  • http://twitter.com/hardyhemmingway Hardy Hemmingway

    Mr Zuckerberg, afaik not the most modest person in the world, must be grinning from ear to chequebook….

  • Anonymous

    Step back MSM there is a new media giant in town.

  • Anonymous

    “… the Internet will help you fight a media war…”

    Hopefully we’ll learn the lesson from the Egyptians.

  • Comrade

    This revolution started on Facebook. This revolution started in June 2010 when hundreds of thousands of Egyptians started collaborating content.

    The revolution has been brewing for many years, and only the most supreme and misguided arrogance would attribute a popular, democratic revolution to the Internet. Ghonim and others need to stop circulating this ridiculous myth that Egyptians needed Facebook or Twitter to get their shit together. This is just another postmodern Orientalist fantasy.

  • Anonymous

    “This revolution started online. This revolution started on Facebook.”

    I am by no means discounting the role social sites played in this revolution or any other, but to think that it started on Facebook is a bit delusional. It started with years of oppression. It started with rigged “democratic” elections. It started with living under a “state of emergency” for 30 years. It started with the transfer of wealth to the elite and poverty growing at incredible rates. It started with the soaring cost of food most of all.

    If you take away the basic rights and necessities from people for long enough you can expect them to react. If you give them free access to the internet you can expect the easy spread of news and information. But a revolution isn’t going to spring up simply because people now have access to Twitter, Facebook, or whatever. At least not without some serious underlying causes that directly effect the populous.

  • Anonymous

    I understand your sentiment and share it to a point — the undercurrents of this revolution have been brewing for decades. That said, the Internet provided the means for the Egyptian people to realize that they shared a common set of goals for the country, and it allowed them to communicate with each other instantly and coordinate the protests over the past three weeks in real time.

    Regardless, it’s a great day for Egypt and a great day for reminding ourselves how important the free flow of information really is to society.

  • Anonymous

    Excuse Me but didn’t I just read about the Internet getting shut down in Egypt just last week so how could have this of happened if Egypt has no Internet access

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/3NVQSZZC5IM66JEOCSFJUV7FCE Jacques G

    The Internet is still controlled by corporations, though its content isn’t, the vehicle (internet medium itself) is. One wrong step by the American people that suggests any hint of threat and as happened briefly in Egypt, the whole thing can be shut down. Egypt is not a crucial nation to the functions of multinational global corporations. America, on the other hand is and the minute anything occurs that hints at threat to the American Corpocracy, the American ‘net will collapse. There needs to be an alternative “back-up” free of corporate control. MetroPCS or any other service provider can flip the switch at their, or the government’s choosing. Julian Assange and Wiki proved the net is a potential weapon against corruption, but that can be severed at any moment if we don’t have an alternative. The Egyptians pulled it off because they don’t threaten American corporations. Here, it could be altogether different.

  • Anonymous

    No, but the fact that Mubarak could not control the flow of information that made its way through the Internet and Facebook made an enormous difference. Both were useful vehicles for this revolution, which started in the hearts and minds of Egyptian citizens.

  • Comrade

    Social media were helpful tools, but remember that they were down for a substantial portion of the past 18 days. If you have been watching the events in Egypt as closely as I have, then you know that the action on the ground was coordinated in the real world. No one is doubting the contributions of social media, but those contributions have been blown all out of proportion. It is a typical Orientalist fantasy to inject some kind of Western origin into every good thing that happens in the Middle East, as if we can take credit vicariously through Facebook for the hard work of the Egyptian people. Facebook and Twitter didn’t ignite the Egyptian revolution, and there is absolutely no evidence to substantiate such a claim. The Egyptian people didn’t need to be educated by Facebook or Twitter in order to realize that they were Egyptians living under a dictatorship; the Western world, on the other hand, was educated by Facebook and Twitter and is typically universalizing the Western experience by projecting it onto Egypt.

  • Anonymous

    It’s true that oppression gave the people the desire for freedom. But what this heroic young man is saying is that the ability to communicate with each other, gave the oppressed the
    ability to over throw opression . . . you arrogantly missed his point. He was dissappeared and was willing to die for this revolution, while you sit safely at your keyboard and nit pick!
    POWER TO THE PEOPLE!
    MIGHT FOR RIGHT
    POWER WITH . . . NOT POWER OVER!
    PRAY FOR THE PEOPLE TO UNITE FOR THE GOOD OF THE WHOLE!
    A NEW CYCLE HAS BEGUN!

  • Anonymous

    I would remind you of the fact that one of Mubarak’s first actions when the protests broke out was to shut down the Internet. He had good reason for doing so.

    Social media was more than a merely helpful tool in this case; it was a communication enabler and allowed 30 years of anger and frustration to be channeled instantaneously and effectively.

  • Comrade

    Those who overestimate the importance of Twitter and Facebook are making the same mistake as Mubarak, who was stupid enough to think that shutting down the Internet would stop the revolution. Facebook and Twitter didn’t make Tahrir happen, and they didn’t keep people in the streets for 18 days. Facebook and Twitter are a fad that allowed Western media to pick up the story. The Egyptians were pushing for change before Tunisia and before 2010—before Facebook—and the Tunisian revolution provided the inspirational jolt that Egypt needed to get moving. This could have happened without Facebook and Twitter; like every other revolution, it demanded a change in public opinion, a change in values, and a change in collective willpower. Those changes depended on material conditions, and they would have come about even if it were the stone age.

  • Anonymous

    It’s true that oppression gave the people the desire for freedom. But what this heroic young man is saying is that the ability to communicate with each other, gave the oppressed the
    ability to over throw opression . . . you arrogantly missed his point. He was dissappeared and was willing to die for this revolution, while you sit safely at your keyboard and nit pick!
    POWER TO THE PEOPLE!

  • Anonymous

    If you had been watching so closely; you would realize that this was only a snippet of this heroic young mans remarks. There were quite a number of interviews that he did, in which he gave full credit to the People who bravely showed up and partisipated. He wept when he was returned from prison and shown the photos of the 300 who were slain by mubaraks thugs.
    Try and make sure you have educated yourself from more than one source, before you launch into pontification. Would you like me to provide you with the links? Or would you prefer to cling blindly to your “insight” which is based on nothing more than a few sentences out of much more complete understanding of the conditions that led up to the revolution . Oh and by the way, Wael is heralded as a hero by the Egyptians who took part in the over throw. Perhaps their insight should carry a bit more weight than yours!

  • Comrade

    I don’t share your belief in the omnipotence of American corporations. American corporate power is sustained by the fantasy that such power is limitless and ubiquitous; however, power is not sustained in spite of such a cynical stance, but is rather enabled by it. The cynic avoids addressing his ethical responsibility to revolt by reciting the mantra of corporate power and its inevitable domination over the people. This domination constitutes the ideological fantasy that pines for the Law, the irrational and traumatic “truth” that is internalized by the subject only on the condition of cynical belief. This way, the subject does not have to think about revolution, because the revolutionary imagination can be negated in advance by universalizing the presence and power of capital.

    The cynic pats himself on the back every time he reasserts his ideological distance from participating in capitalism. Marx’s definition of ideology no longer works, in the case (“They do not know it, but they are doing it.”). Instead, the ideological formula becomes, “They know they are doing it, but they say they do not believe in it, so they keep doing it.” Reproducing the fantasy of corporate omnipotence isn’t subversive: it is exactly what they want you to believe.

  • Comrade

    If you had been watching so closely; you would realize that this was only a snippet of this heroic young mans remarks.

    Well, this point is a little irrelevant, given that I am contending Ghonim’s magnification of the role of social media, and not his actions or feelings in or about the Egyptian revolution.

  • Comrade

    No, I received his point: I just think he’s wrong. I can see that you seem quite defensive of Ghonim, and that’s fine. However, I think it is important to keep in mind that blowing the role of social media out of proportion has the effect of discounting the material conditions that led up to and enabled the revolution in Egypt. It is simply irresponsible (not to mention Orientalist) to circulate the myth that Facebook enabled the Egyptians to depose Mubarak.

  • Anonymous

    It’s my understanding that MOST people i Egypt DO NOT Internet Access. No even a decent meal.

  • Anonymous

    LOL. Believe me, I didn’t “arrogantly” miss anything. I’ve been designing, and developing websites and web applications for well over a decade. I’ve done focus groups with users for countless projects. I understand how people use and interact with the internet down to the smallest details because I’ve done the research and work. I’m not pretending my career makes me the end-all know-all on the subject, but I certainly have a very good understanding of how people interact with the internet and how to motivate people online.

    You seem to be under the illusion that a Facebook or Twitter friend is the same thing as a real friend, which on occasion they are. But like most people I’m sure you have dozens of “friends” that you’ve never met in real life and likely never will. What varies greatly between these types of friends is the bond you share with each. If you think that people would be willing to do the same things for a Facebook “friend” as they would for a real friend, you’re kidding yourself. It takes people you share a strong bond with to motivate most people in to doing something outside their norm.

    You can look through the pages of history and find social uprisings, protests, war, etc that were rooted in some form of oppression or another. America was founded because of oppression. The Civil War was largely fought over slavery (regardless of what you hear on FOX). Oppressed women protested for their right to vote. African Americans protested against segregation. All of these revolutions occurred long before computers were available. They occurred because an oppressed populous had enough and reached a breaking point. They were successful because of the social ties that bind us as humans who have been pushed too far and are unwilling to be pushed any further. Obviously I just gave a small selection of examples here in America but you would find thousands upon thousands throughout human history.

    The revolution in Egypt would have occurred regardless of whether or not Facebook or Twitter existed. Just look at the first week or so of protests as an example. They literally turned off the internet in Egypt and the populous continued to protest, they continued to be coordinated, and the size of the crowds continued to grow despite this massive communication blockade. If these types of sites were so absolutely necessary, so paramount to this revolution then it would have ended the moment the internet was removed from the picture.

    Again, I’m not trying to discount how social media played a role in this revolution, it was obviously important. The young woman who made the video on YouTube, fearlessly showing her face mind you, while speaking of oppression and asking for her countrymen (and women) to come out and protest beside her was a big factor. But she made that video due to the oppression she felt for years, and she knew everyone else felt it. She made it because 4 men lit themselves on fire (at least 1 of which died) in protest of this oppression. People felt inspired by this person standing up against injustice, and not just any person…a young woman (Keep in mind this is the Middle East).

    Throughout history all it’s taken to start a revolution has been an oppressed group and someone, or someones that are unwilling to take it anymore and say enough is enough. I think you are ignorantly confusing the method of delivery with the message itself. They are two entirely separate things. I can promise you that no one is going to light themselves on fire because someone on Facebook or Twitter recommends it.

  • Anonymous

    Here’s a great article on CNET by someone who actually knows how to write and can sum it all up a little better than I can.
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13577_3-20031600-36.html

  • Comrade

    I can see that you updated your post. By the way, being wrong doesn’t mean that you also have to be an ass. Chill out, would you?

    The people have many grievances against Mubarak’s regime involving police brutality, torture, a lack of free speech, state of emergency laws, inflated food prices, institutionalized poverty, high unemployment, low minimum wages, government corruption, and of course an absence of the democratic process itself. Those are the material conditions that precipitated the Egyptian revolution, and not some social media fad—even if a minor political figure like Ghonim says something to the contrary.

  • Guest

    You know, I’m getting a little sick and tired of the “Jews Are Evil” shit. If you’d been pissed on for three thousand years, you’d get up, too, enjoined cuckoos and all.

    There isn’t a ONE of us who can look at the history of our particular race or culture or ethnicity or whatever one wishes to call the particularities of food source, land, and sunlight that equates to our AREism, and claim that there isn’t a monstrosity of skeletons in the closet.

    This entire species is in its adolescence, it’s time for us to stop using each other as mirrors to measure our dicks, and start having a look at OURSELVES before we decide to piss on the OTHER for all of humanity’s woes.

    GROW THE FUCK UP AND CLEAN UP YOUR OWN BASKET – WE’RE ALL EVERY ONE FUCKING ROTTEN TO THE CORE.

    Let’s get OVER it.

    You know – that fucking ascension thing.

  • Anonymous

    I have a feeling that if Wael Ghonim meets Zuckerberg (something that I’m sure Zuckerberg is already working on with the FBI and his PR shills), Wael will be greatly disappointed when he realizes what a cocky piece of shit Zuckerberg really is.

  • Anonymous

    What is irresponsible is taking a few sentences out of context, and then not being a good enough journalist to make sure that what was PRINTED was the WHOLE OF WHAT WAS SAID..
    And what’s with your fetish for the word “Orientalist?”
    IFyou had troubled yourself to actually read up on the topic, you would have realized that everything that you wrote was pointless. Because Wael never took credit for the revolution or gave more credit to the internet than it deseved. Which was that it served as a tool to bring the people to the point of launching the revolution. Hint: check your facts before you get your undies in a bunch over a point that was never made!

  • Comrade

    Nothing I said was taken out of context. Ghomin literally claims in the above quote that the revolution started on Facebook. People are calling it the Facebook Revolution, or the Twitter Revolution. Ghomin isn’t alone among a chorus of other people who have jumped on the idea that this revolution really did originate from Facebook, an assertion that stands in total contradiction to the material conditions at hand, therefore eliding the reality of the Egyptian revolution. It is my belief that this narrative of a Facebook revolution strategically displaces the material conditions that led to the revolution so that they may be ignored. Capitalist ideology “wants” to ignore the class warfare at hand, that the labor movement is playing a significant role in the revolution, and that the revolution is largely anti-capitalist. In fact, just today Obama distilled the entire Egyptian revolution into one of an “entrepreneurial spirit.” Most media coverage has simply ignored the socioeconomic struggle in favor of viewing the revolution as one engaging election rights and police state tactics; the reality of class struggle gets smothered.

    As for Orientalism, look up Edward Said. It is basically a form of Western cultural bigotry towards the Middle East and Asia, and it largely informs the right wing. So Orientalism represents just one of many ways in which liberalism is complicit with even the most drastic right-wing politics.

  • Anonymous

    From one (un-datable) dink to another…

    Hey, here’s a tip… Don’t use the tools that your “enemy” provides… And, grow up.

  • Anonymous

    “No one is going to light themselves on fire because someone on Facebook recommends it.” You have ignorantly made a very long and pointless diatribe about a point that was never being made.
    You have blathered on endlessly trying to prove something was not true that no one said was true!
    I am going to explain it real slow. No one is arguing that the revolution happened entirely because of Facebook! No one was saying that the opressed and opression did not play a crucial role.
    If someone said they wanted to meet the inventer of air bags, because they had saved their childs life, it doesn’t autamatically follow that they think that airbags are the end all totality of the auto industry.
    Please get a grip on yourself and stop agruing against a point that no one is making.
    The writer of the above article left volumes out of what this Heroic young man actually said. And everyone is rabidly agruing a point that he never made. However a couple of his remarks were printed, as though he did say that! Just because you consider yourself and expert on website construction doesn’t mean that you have actually researched what the young man that was quoted,said IN FULL. GET IT?????????

  • Anonymous

    If you had bothered to research the whole of what he said and not based your belief on part oF his remarks you would not be under the false impression that he magnified the role of the internet. You would actually KNOW what he magified.

  • Anonymous

    I believe taking pot shots at someone who has been identified as a Heroic figure by the people who actually risked their lives . . . is being an ass. You chill out and get your facts straight before you criticize the brave with your ignorance.

  • http://madisonleathersmith.com leathersmith

    there are many ways to dial into a modem somewhere

    some were even doing over ham radio

    try to stay current OK?

  • Anonymous

    How would you know? arm quarter back . . I have friends in Tahrir Square. The work of the internet had been accomplished by the time it got shut down. It was a tool to organize and that ability is what made the revolution successful. You just don’t get it.
    Timing is everything.You know what is worse than someone who just doesn’t get it? Someone who just doesn’t get it but thinks they do.

  • Comrade

    I think you’ve misunderstood basically everything I said. I do not deny that Facebook played an important role in communications. What I contest is this grand narrative that characterizes the Egyptian revolution as a “Facebook revolution,” and that claims the revolution started on Facebook. The revolution did not start on Facebook; there was a great deal of resistance and organizing before Facebook became a part of it. Also, please see my comment about capitalism, because that is the reason why I object to placing Facebook at the center of the revolution.

  • cannotvote

    Use the energy instead against them – as in Judo, where a slight person can use the energy of the larger assailant …… etc….. think again!

  • cannotvote

    Or is Wael causing division?! Setting the cat amongst the pigeons – eat the rich, or make them eat their own! The Art of War is not as simple as it seems!

  • cannotvote

    There’s alway bad apples, apples aren’t bad – just bad apples are bad!

  • Guest

    Thanks, eh? I expect I’ll eat a lot of shit for that comment; much appreciation that the first reply was well measured. In kinship…

  • cannotvote

    aipac, then who are the zionist in the UK parliament, The US senate etc…..zionism is the issue not Jews per se, it’s religion that’s at fault – in it’s excesses and delusions! The future holds a society without organised religion – thats the final solution, where all peoples are equal, no one is chosen over another – by a fictitious god!

  • Anonymous

    i have no idea how significant facebook or the internet was in this revolution but the underlying and long-term economic, social and political factors were what made it happen, and some of this technology certainly aided things helped it along but here’s one from mcclatchy which you can take as you will, it certainly seemed to be making the rounds in Egypt

    http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2011/02/10/108463/in-cairos-tahrir-square-festive.html#ixzz1DbcIxdCm

    …….They told the same jokes again and again, laughing each time. Mubarak meets former Egyptian presidents Gamal Abdel Nasser and Anwar Sadat in the afterlife. They ask him what did him in, poison or assassination?

    “Facebook,” says Mubarak, a reference to social media’s instrumental role in organizing the uprising…..

  • Anonymous

    I have not misunderstood that you turned a great victory for the oppressed and an opportunity to join with them in celebration . . . into an opportunity to make it about you and your views. As I originally pointed out, had you actually embraced the enormity of what this means for the people of Egypt instead of making it about you, you might not have gotten stuck on semantics. If you want to understand and not just prove that you are right, then you would realize this is about freedom and not semantics. This is about Heros . . .
    the people of Egypt. And THEIR Hero who organized them. This revolt was instigated by the youth and their new technology. If in Wael’s exuberance at the bravery and new found courage of his peers he called it something that threatens you. . . It is not about you. And further he made it clear repeatedly that the meaning that you took is not what he meant nor is it important here. Not to him nor to the people of Egypt. TO THEM HE IS A HERO.
    He organized them, he risked his life for them and he represented hope to them. Facebook is just a word that represents the vitality and the new technology of the youth. And make no mistake
    ( look it up: the majority of the Egyptian population is under 30) it was the youth who galvanized and got this movement off the ground. Were they motivated by years and years of oppression? That was a given, people don’t rebel because their well and happy. Facebook was the magic word that gave them hope that something new that they possessed would make they’re dreams come true. Not about you. Join with me won’t you in celebrating for them and with them. Bless their courageous hearts!

  • Anonymous

    It is perhaps the ideas/ideals that people would struggle for and I disagree that people cannot be passionate about a matter without ever having met.

  • Comrade

    I’m all about celebrating. In Atlanta, we’ve been having rallies in solidarity with Egypt since the first week. For me, part of that celebration involves paying justice to the historical reality.

  • https://plus.google.com/u/0/102459879410215087128/posts Tyler Gustoff Moore

    Some mighty fine free advertising for Facebook. I’ve not a personal vendetta against the site, and in this particular situation Facebook really helped, but I maintain the functionality of Facebok is not all that different from that offered by sites dating back to even the walled garden of AOL back in the day. That said, congratulations to the Egyptians and good luck to their moderates being the ones who can take charge and decide their future, whatever that means, and not a smaller, unrepresentative subgroup that can simply scream louder or intimidate.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Mark Zuckerberg and Google deserve no credit at all for the Egyptian revolution. What tipped the balance was the involvement of militant labor.

    All power to the people! Socialism now!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Absolutely right. The Egyptians could have done what they did with dial-up modems and bulletin boards.

    There is nothing intriniscally revolutionary about Facebook or Google. In the long run, the corporatism they represent is pure evil. In fact, both corporations present possibilities of 360-degree surveillance and social control that are absolutely terrifying.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Never mind. There’s always a Hero Capitalist fooling the suckers somewhere.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Point worth making: the future of mankind lies with the human race, not with the mostly irremediable injustices of the past. But this is an easy point to abuse.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Why does RawStory attract so many anti-Semites and Libertarians?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Never mind. It’s the hero-entrepreneur who will save the day, not those nasty Working People.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    You are right that it could be altogether different here.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Profane the Entrepreneur and Hippy Capitalism, you dog, and you’ll soon feel the lash! Blasphemer! And where is your Ron Paul sticker, dog??????

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Internet access was limited and they went on with their revolution anyway. Google and Facebook were conveniences. The Internet did not make the revolution. They could have done it with telephones and mimeograph machines.

    Try to keep up, you patronizing jackass. K??

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Take a pill.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Useful, of course. But Mark Zuckerberg is not and never will be a revolutionary of any kind.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Excuse me, but what does the Internet do for anyone but allow them to sit behind a keyboard and bitch? Take yourself for example. Tends to undermine your idea that the Heroic Internet Entrepreneur is the onlie begetter of the revolution.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Social media has a high potential for surveillance and repression. In the long run, this may be its lasting contribution–people snooping everywhere, everything you do tracked and sifted through for information that can be used to manipulate you.

    Revolutionaries would probably be better off using cruder technology in many cases.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    You obviously aren’t in control of your emotions or your argument. So you brandish the name of Wael and work up a head of fraudulent outrage over alleged attacks on him.

    You’re not half as intelligent as you think you are.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Q.E.D. Of course. But some people will go to any lengths to put a petty-bourgeois techno-narcissistic gloss on everything.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Amen

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Zuckerberg’s a shit. And facebook is a very mixed blessing.

  • Anonymous

    Facebook is the single most important invention ever in the world, more important than the wheel, more important than fire, more important than internet porn. No actually it really is important in that in a small way it allowed people to connect and make a change, like the telegraph, the telephone and even the idiot box television. It’s good it was here even after it is gone.

  • Anonymous
  • DesertSun59

    Wael Ghonim is unaware that Mark Z. is Jewish, despite the fact that Mark Z. has proclaimed himself to be atheist. But wouldn’t it be ironic if Facebook/Mark Z. became the cause for Egyptian/Israeli reconciliation.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Since when does heroism, if that’s what it is, put all comments of alleged hero beyond criticism.

    Mark Zuckerberg is a predatory little shit.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TF72KWIG5DGSPE3ZXDK6FX4KTQ Robert Burned

    Comment withdrawn. (Edit not working locally).

  • Guest

    well posited – thank you

  • Anonymous

    And here is why. .
    http://www.activistpost.com/20… and
    http://landdestroyer.blogspot….
    Hey Raw story why don’t you do the real story!!

  • Anonymous

    **You can’t be serious. Ghonim didn’t know ZUCKERBERG was a jew. Please.

  • Anonymous

    The comments have gotten scambled . . .I was talking about Wael Ghonim.

  • Anonymous

    ..All the more reason for them to want to take it away!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bob-Zentrails/100001475536421 Bob Zentrails

    Something tells me he will get his wish. LOL

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bob-Zentrails/100001475536421 Bob Zentrails

    I agree, but at least they now have https:/ security. Go to your facebook security setting and check the https box. It’s not on by default, but at least it’s there now.

    If you don’t check that box, everyone withing 100 feet or so of you can access your computer easily when you use WiFi.

  • Anonymous

    Hey, little, stupid Arab boy….

    “”The reason why is the Internet will help you fight a media war, which is something the Egyptian government regime played very well in 1970, 1980, 1990, and when the Internet came along they couldn’t play it.”"

    Really? Well, when you grow up or become honest enough to admit that the people who control Facebook, etc., are the very same people who really do not want you to become stable. Aka, Al CIA Duh, and their compatriots, come back and have a real discussion about the internet.

    If you are such an internet wizard, then why don’t you try to create a safer, non-controlled network? A non-US military Facebook, if you will….

    As soon as you kids get a brain, you will find your “information” conveniently documented and used against you.

    If you’re going to continue to be a little Arab patsy boy, then how can you expect any kind of respect from the west? We know our leaders, and the “creators” of Facebook, would rather send your country back to the Stone Age. Why don’t you?

  • Anonymous

    Didn’t the revolution start when they took away the internet?

    This is the lesson despots and presidents should take away from this – allowing people to mill about endlessly, posting posturing facebook entries and revolution fantasies gives them the illusion of rebellion, and taking away their “community” gives them nowhere else to go but the streets.

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