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Hey, NY Times, 2006 is calling. They want their narrative back.

By Amanda Marcotte
Saturday, March 26, 2011 14:13 EDT
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I can’t do food blogging this week—it’s been insanely busy, and I just didn’t have time. I don’t really have time now to blog, because I’m going to the WAM! conference in New York, but I thought I’d tell you a little story about the history of blogging, which is what I’m going to speak about.

Once, a long long long time ago (2004 to around 2006), there was an interesting new tribe of people called The Bloggers. These folks didn’t have traditional media jobs, mostly, but they fashioned themselves as worthy of expressing written opinions. So they armed themselves with URLs and some primitive HTML skills, and got to work opinionating. Some times they did actual journalism, even. A subset of The Bloggers were remarkably young by the standards of punditry, so they were called the Juicebox Mafia.

At first, The Bloggers were treated as a curiosity by the mainstream media. Then as a threat. Then as peers. Then The Bloggers actually started to get paid by larger organizations for their work. They started to go on TV to be treated as experts, which they actually were. Many of them now support themselves as full time writers.

And according to the New York Times, all the members of this curious tribe of bloggers-turned-professional have penises. And they’re remarkably pale of skin tone.

I find myself disagreeing, though I don’t have time to discuss why. But I leave it to you, commenters, to spot the flaws in that article.

FYI, I have nothing against Brian, Matt, Ezra, or Dave, all of whom I think are awesome and who I link and tweet at. This isn’t about them, but about the article.

Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte is a freelance journalist born and bred in Texas, but now living in the writer reserve of Brooklyn. She focuses on feminism, national politics, and pop culture, with the order shifting depending on her mood and the state of the nation.
 
 
 
 
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