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Adorable!

By Amanda Marcotte
Tuesday, May 17, 2011 21:30 EDT
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This is why we can't have nice things (via Atrios):

Single father George only wants the best for his 16-year-old daughter, Tessa. So when he finds a box of condoms on her nightstand, he moves them out of their apartment in New York City to a house in the suburbs. But all Tessa sees is the horror of over-manicured lawns and plastic Franken-moms. Being in the ‘burbs can be hell, but it also may just bring Tessa and George closer than they’ve ever been.

This is the set-up for a "Suburgatory", an ABC sitcom that is not fooling me with language in its description like "bitingly ironic" or "single camera".  This is what I'm seeing:

Ostensible, pandering message: The horrors of female sexuality can be beat back with wholesome middle American goodness!

Actual message: Try your luck with pulling out, because parents are unreasonable assholes.

Isn't it so adorable and touching when men act like they have a god-given right to have daughters who don't grow into women? Isn't it wonderful when men believe because they spawned female offspring, they should treat them like permanent children? Don't you just want to coo your head off when a man puts his daughter in a position to take risks with her sexual health to avoid alerting him to the fact that she's not in pigtails anymore?

I don't have a problem with sweet sitcoms about middle American life.  That's why I like "Parks and Recreation".  Of course, that show doesn't act like there's something wrong with you if you both have a vagina and choose to use it.  So that helps.  But that ABC thinks psychotic parental freakouts are something to sell a sitcom on disturbs me. If Daddy was the villain, okay, but this description emphasizes how "close" they get because he decides that his control over her body matters more than her health or wellbeing.

Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte is a freelance journalist born and bred in Texas, but now living in the writer reserve of Brooklyn. She focuses on feminism, national politics, and pop culture, with the order shifting depending on her mood and the state of the nation.
 
 
 
 
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