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Poll: People confident debt deal will be reached, but disapprove of tactics

By Kase Wickman
Monday, July 18, 2011 12:42 EDT
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As debt crisis talks and negotiations continue for the second week running at the White House, the media continues to barrage the public with reports of seemingly endless negotiations and attempts at deals. Results of a new CBS News poll signal that the majority of people are ready for a solution, and disapprove of both sides’ handling of debt negotiations.

Though those surveyed weren’t pleased with President Barack Obama’s handling of negotiations — 48 percent disapproved, 43 percent approved — members of Congress fared even worse in the public’s opinion. Democrats in Congress were handed a 31 percent approval, and Republicans garnered only a 21 percent approval rating.

Unsurprisingly, when split along party lines, differences in opinion are quite dramatic. For example, 69 percent of Democratic respondents approved of the way Obama is handling negotiations, while just 15 percent of Republicans approved. A paltry 11 percent of Democrats gave the thumbs up to Republican members of Congress, while GOP constituents gave their ideological leaders a 42 percent approval rating.

Though there is little confidence in the politicians themselves, those in the poll seemed confident that an agreement would be settled upon. The August 2 deadline set for a debt ceiling agreement (the continuing resolutions and cost-cutting, temporary measures that have kept government spending afloat will run out then, Obama said) will hold, according to those polled. Sixty-six percent said that they “probably would” reach an agreement by then, while 31 percent doubted a solution would be reached.

Kase Wickman
Kase Wickman
Kase Wickman is a reporter for Raw Story. She holds a journalism degree from Boston University and grew up in Eugene, OR. Her work has been featured in The Boston Globe, Village Voice Media, The Christian Science Monitor, The Houston Chronicle and on NPR, among others. She lives in New York City and tweets from @kasewickman.
 
 
 
 
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