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AL. state Sen apologizes for calling blacks ‘aboriginals’

By Andrew Jones
Wednesday, September 28, 2011 12:24 EDT
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A powerful Alabama politician apologized Tuesday evening for an inflammatory remark made about African-Americans.

State Sen. Scott Beason (R) was caught on tape in June calling blacks in Green Country, Alabama “aboriginal.” The scene was filmed during an undercover FBI investigation on whether politicians were bribed by special interests to pass a bill legalizing poker video games.

Beason told the audience at a press conference that his words were “inappropriate, careless, and unnecessary.”

“My purpose here today is to say that I’m very sorry and I apologize to anyone whose feelings were hurt by my comment,” he said. “It’s the right thing to do. I look at it as if I said something that would hurt one of my friend’s feelings.”

Beason indicated that he “wanted to address the issue sooner,” but waited until after the corruption trail ended, which did not have any convictions. Despite Democrats across the state calling for him to resign or be removed from his powerful position as chairman of the state’s Senate Rules Committee, the Republican Caucus felt Beason’s apology was enough to let him remain in his position.

WATCH: Video from Youtube, which appeared on September 27, 2011

Andrew Jones
Andrew Jones
Andrew Jones is a staff writer/reporter for Raw Story. Besides covering politics, he is also a freelance sports journalist, as well as a slam poetry and music artist. You can follow him on Twitter @sluggahjells.
 
 
 
 
By commenting, you agree to our terms of service
and to abide by our commenting policy.
 

AL. state Sen apologizes for calling blacks ‘aboriginals’

By Andrew Jones
google plus icon
 
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Email this page

A powerful Alabama politician apologized Tuesday evening for an inflammatory remark made about African-Americans.

State Sen. Scott Beason (R) was caught on tape in June calling blacks in Green Country, Alabama “aboriginal.” The scene was filmed during an undercover FBI investigation on whether politicians were bribed by special interests to pass a bill legalizing poker video games.

Beason told the audience at a press conference that his words were “inappropriate, careless, and unnecessary.”

“My purpose here today is to say that I’m very sorry and I apologize to anyone whose feelings were hurt by my comment,” he said. “It’s the right thing to do. I look at it as if I said something that would hurt one of my friend’s feelings.”

Beason indicated that he “wanted to address the issue sooner,” but waited until after the corruption trail ended, which did not have any convictions. Despite Democrats across the state calling for him to resign or be removed from his powerful position as chairman of the state’s Senate Rules Committee, the Republican Caucus felt Beason’s apology was enough to let him remain in his position.

WATCH: Video from Youtube, which appeared on September 27, 2011

Andrew Jones
Andrew Jones
Andrew Jones is a staff writer/reporter for Raw Story. Besides covering politics, he is also a freelance sports journalist, as well as a slam poetry and music artist. You can follow him on Twitter @sluggahjells.
 
 
 
 
By commenting, you agree to our terms of service
and to abide by our commenting policy.
 
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