Quantcast

Yemen dictator heads to U.S. for medical treatment

By Agence France-Presse
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 12:30 EDT
google plus icon
Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh addresses an electoral rally in the Yemeni Red Sea port of Aden in 2006. Saleh has flown to the United States for medical treatment as his country prepared for elections next month for his successor, an Omani official said. (AFP Photo/Khaled Fazaa)
 
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Email this page

Veteran Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh flew to the United States for medical treatment on Wednesday as his country prepared for elections next month for his successor, an Omani official said.

Saleh had been in the Gulf sultanate since Sunday with his wife and five of his children amid mounting speculation about his future.

After months of stalling, the Yemeni leader finally signed up to a Gulf-brokered transfer of power deal in November under which an early presidential election is due to be held on February 21.

Despite strong criticism from demonstrators who have kept up 12 months of protests against Saleh’s regime, Vice President Abdrabuh Mansur Hadi is expected to be the sole candidate under the deal struck with the parliamentary opposition.

Saleh suffered severe blast wounds from a bombing at the presidential palace in June last year and is scheduled to receive treatment at a New York hospital.

US ambassador Gerald M Feierstein said on Tuesday that Saleh had been granted a visa for purely medical reasons, but that his absence in the run-up to the election of his successor was in the interests of Yemen.

“We think that him not being here will help the transition, we think it will improve the atmosphere,” the ambassador said.

Saleh had been expected to travel to New York for treatment late last year, but aides said he cancelled the trip at the request of his General People’s Congress party.

Late last week, parliament approved a controversial bill granting Saleh blanket immunity from prosecution. He has been in power in Sanaa since 1978.

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
By commenting, you agree to our terms of service
and to abide by our commenting policy.
 
Google+