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Actress apologizes for appearing in Hoekstra’s Super Bowl ad

By Eric W. Dolan
Wednesday, February 15, 2012 19:38 EDT
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Asian woman from Hoekstra ad
 
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Lisa Chan, the 21-year-old Asian-American actress who appeared in U.S. Senate candidate Pete Hoekstra’s controversial ad, has apologized for her role.

“I am deeply sorry for any pain that the character I portrayed brought to my communities,” she wrote on Facebook. “As a recent college grad who has spent time working to improve communities and empower those without a voice, this role is not in any way representative of who I am. It was absolutely a mistake on my part and one that, over time, I hope can be forgiven. I feel horrible about my participation and I am determined to resolve my actions.”

Her apology was first reported by the Angry Asian Man blog.

In the 30-second ad, which aired in Michigan during the Super Bowl, Chan spoke in broken English and accused Hoekstra’s rival, Democratic incumbent Sen. Debbie Stabenow, of helping the Chinese economy.

“Thank you Michigan Senator Debbie Spenditnow,” Chan said. “Debbie spends so much American money. You borrow more and more from us. You’re economy get very weak, ours get very good. We take your jobs. Thank you Debbie Spenditnow.”

The liberal-leaning Asian American Action Fund said the ad was “reminiscent of Asian prostitutes saying ‘Me love you long time’ in Hollywood films.” But Hoekstra told Politico that the ad was satirical and did not have any racial overtones.

Stabenow used the ad to raise $169,210 for her re-election campaign.

Eric W. Dolan
Eric W. Dolan
Eric W. Dolan has served as an editor for Raw Story since August 2010, and is based out of Sacramento, California. He grew up in the suburbs of Chicago and received a Bachelor of Science from Bradley University. Eric is also the publisher and editor of PsyPost. You can follow him on Twitter @ewdolan.
 
 
 
 
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