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Santorum mega donor wonders if Obama’s teleprompters ‘are bullet-proof’

By Stephen C. Webster
Thursday, April 12, 2012 11:05 EDT
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Millionaire Foster Friess, appearing on MSNBC in Feb. 2012. Screenshot via YouTube.
 
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In an interview featured Wednesday night on Fox Business, retired hedge fund manager Foster Friess, the largest donor to super PACs that had formerly supported ex-Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA) for president, made a distasteful comment about guns being aimed at President Barack Obama.

“There are a lot of things that haven’t been hammered at because Rick and Mitt have been going at each other,” Friess said, according to The Los Angeles Times. “Now that they have trained their barrels on President Obama, I hope his teleprompters are bullet-proof.”

The paper said that he immediately back-tracked on that remark, and later told ABC News that he regretted the statement.

While most Fox Business feature interviews are published to the channel’s website shortly after they’re aired, video of Friess’s comments was nowhere to be found more than 18 hours later, even as fresh clips appeared online from the Fox Business Thursday morning shows.

Friess, who’s spent almost $2 million supporting his favored candidate this election season, said in the wake of Santorum’s concession this week that he would begin supporting former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) instead.

He previously made waves when he said that women should use tablets of aspirin “between their knees” as a contraception device, instead of solutions offered by modern medicine. He made the statement in furtherance of Santorum’s proposal to ban all birth control and prosecute doctors who help women terminate pregnancies.

Romney, while not as extreme as Santorum on women’s issues, still claims he wants to “get rid of” Planned Parenthood, the largest non-profit network of women’s health clinics in the nation. He’s also claimed that as Governor of Massachusetts, he fought to remove mandates for contraception coverage by private insurance — but that’s simply not true.

Today, Romney insists he’s a “pro-life” conservative who opposes all abortions, but he’s also told voters in 2002 that he’s refused to “have a label” in the abortion debate, and swore to uphold “pro-choice” policies. Despite his ever-changing positions on women’s health issues, Romney trails Obama tremendously in recent polls of American women.

Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster is the senior editor of Raw Story, and is based out of Austin, Texas. He previously worked as the associate editor of The Lone Star Iconoclast in Crawford, Texas, where he covered state politics and the peace movement’s resurgence at the start of the Iraq war. Webster has also contributed to publications such as True/Slant, Austin Monthly, The Dallas Business Journal, The Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Weekly, The News Connection and others. Follow him on Twitter at @StephenCWebster.
 
 
 
 
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