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Issa calls Obama admin. ‘the most corrupt government in history’

By Stephen C. Webster
Tuesday, April 24, 2012 16:54 EDT
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Congressman Darrell Issa (R-CA). Photo: AFP.
 
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The Chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform thinks that the Obama administration is “the most corrupt in history,” and he’s not afraid to say it.

Speaking to Bloomberg on Tuesday, Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) insisted that the president’s political appointees must be held accountable for their actions, citing the recent General Services Administration graft scandal and a failed solar power company, Solyndra, that the Obama administration had invested in.

“If they reported to the White House and the White House did nothing, shame on the White House,” he said. “But even if they didn’t report to the White House, we still have to say, ‘Why weren’t they doing their job of protecting the American people?’ Political appointees cost a lot of money to the taxpayers. If they’re… giving awards for bad behavior, they’ve got to go.”

He added: “But again, we’re very busy in Washington with a corrupt government, with a government that I said a year ago, because of the money, because of the TARP and stimulus funds, was going to be the most corrupt government in history, and it is proving to be that.”

In spite of Issa’s allegations, he only cited two specific scandals. According to journalist Haynes Johnson, the “most corrupt” label actually belongs to the administration of President Ronald Reagan. Plagued by dozens of scandals like selling weapons to Iran, rigging federal grants, the savings and loan crisis and other assorted political skullduggery, it all ended with 138 officials having been investigated, indicted or convicted — the most of any U.S. presidency, ever.

This video is from Bloomberg, broadcast Tuesday, April 24, 2012.

Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster is the senior editor of Raw Story, and is based out of Austin, Texas. He previously worked as the associate editor of The Lone Star Iconoclast in Crawford, Texas, where he covered state politics and the peace movement’s resurgence at the start of the Iraq war. Webster has also contributed to publications such as True/Slant, Austin Monthly, The Dallas Business Journal, The Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Weekly, The News Connection and others. Follow him on Twitter at @StephenCWebster.
 
 
 
 
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