Quantcast

Pulitzer Prize-winning Vietnam War photographer Horst Fass dies at 79

By Agence France-Presse
Friday, May 11, 2012 12:15 EDT
google plus icon
Pulitzer Prize-winner, Horst Faas, poses in front of his images at the International Festival of Photojournalism in Perpignan, France in 2008. Faas, known for his haunting pictures of the Vietnam war, died on Thursday, his employer for 50 years the Associated Press said. (AFP Photo/Jeff Pachoud)
 
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Email this page

Two-time Pulitzer-prize winning German photographer Horst Faas, known for his haunting pictures of the Vietnam war, died on Thursday, his employer for 50 years the Associated Press said.

Faas, who was 79, covered the Vietnam war from 1962 to 1974 — longer than any other photographer — and won a Pulitzer award in 1965 for his war photography.

He won a second Pulitzer in 1972 for his coverage of the conflict in Bangladesh along with another AP photographer, Michel Laurent, for the series “Death in Dacca.”

While out in the field with US soldiers Faas was seriously wounded in a rocket-propelled grenade attack in 1967.

As chief of photo operations for the US news agency in Saigon — now Ho Chi Minh City — Faas took the decision in June 1972 to move the famous photograph of a badly burned Vietnamese girl fleeing an aerial napalm attack down a road.

The picture, taken by photographer Huynh Cong Ut (Nick Ut), also won a Pulitzer prize. Several of Faas’ colleagues believed the picture should not have been transmitted because the victim was naked.

In later years Faas also won the Robert Capa photography prize in 1997, and the Eriche Salomon prize in 2005.

Faas fell ill in Hanoi in 2005 and became paralyzed from the waist down. His health seriously deteriorated in late 2008, and he had been hospitalized since February.

Faas died in Munich, the AP said.

[Pulitzer Prize-winner, Horst Faas, poses in front of his images at the International Festival of Photojournalism in Perpignan, France in 2008. AFP Photo/Jeff Pachoud]

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
By commenting, you agree to our terms of service
and to abide by our commenting policy.
 
Google+