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Scientists: ‘Oxygen substitute’ shot can keep non-breathing patients alive

By Stephen C. Webster
Thursday, June 28, 2012 10:54 EDT
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A doctor prepares to give an injection. Photo: Shutterstock.com, all rights reserved.
 
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Researchers at the Boston Children’s Hospital have developed a new microparticle that can be used to oxygenate blood cells and keep a non-breathing patient alive for up to 30 minutes, according to the scientific journal Science Transitional Medicine.

The particles, a combination of fat and oxygen, can be injected directly into a vein, giving medical professionals precious time to properly ventilate a dying patient.

Researchers first tested the injection on rabbits and found that oxygen saturation increased within seconds of the particles hitting the animals’ bloodstream, despite the rabbits’ tracheas being blocked.

Scientists also predicted that the solution could one day be standard in every hospital, ambulance and life-flight helicopter as a life-saving, “short-term oxygen substitute.”
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Photo: Shutterstock.com, all rights reserved.

(H/T: Science Daily)

Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster is the senior editor of Raw Story, and is based out of Austin, Texas. He previously worked as the associate editor of The Lone Star Iconoclast in Crawford, Texas, where he covered state politics and the peace movement’s resurgence at the start of the Iraq war. Webster has also contributed to publications such as True/Slant, Austin Monthly, The Dallas Business Journal, The Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Weekly, The News Connection and others. Follow him on Twitter at @StephenCWebster.
 
 
 
 
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