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Doctors remove ‘parasitic twin’ from Ethiopian girl’s body

By Stephen C. Webster
Friday, July 6, 2012 10:44 EDT
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Workitu Dababa, a 17-year-old Ethiopian girl who had a parasitic twin removed from her body. Screenshot via The International Business Times.
 
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A 17-year-old girl in Ethiopia has been given a new lease on life by doctors, who removed two additional legs and two additional arms from her body.

The girl, Werkitu Dababa, had a condition called a “parasitic twin,” a very rare deformity caused by a twin sibling who does not fully form in the womb.

Describing her condition, Dr. Eric Gokcen, who conducted the surgery, wrote last month that Dababa’s twin had “no head, but instead, has a deformed trunk with undeveloped arms and legs protruding from the girl’s pelvis.”

“This is going to be very difficult surgery, and worldwide, very few surgeons have had any experience at all with these surgeries,” he added. “This type of deformity probably only occurs in less than 1 in a million births. To have the patient present as a teenager has probably never been documented before.”

At a press conference this week following the surgery, Dababa appeared to be in good spirits and said she was happy and relieved to have her ordeal over with.

This video is from MSNBC.com, published on Thursday, July 6, 2012.

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

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(H/T: International Business Times)

Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster
Stephen C. Webster is the senior editor of Raw Story, and is based out of Austin, Texas. He previously worked as the associate editor of The Lone Star Iconoclast in Crawford, Texas, where he covered state politics and the peace movement’s resurgence at the start of the Iraq war. Webster has also contributed to publications such as True/Slant, Austin Monthly, The Dallas Business Journal, The Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Weekly, The News Connection and others. Follow him on Twitter at @StephenCWebster.
 
 
 
 
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