Quantcast

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak wants to become an Australian citizen: reports

By Agence France-Presse
Tuesday, September 25, 2012 2:15 EDT
google plus icon
Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, seen here in May 2012, has predicted "horrible problems" in the coming years as cloud-based computing takes hold via AFP
 
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Email this page

Steve Wozniak, who co-founded Apple with the late Steve Jobs, revealed Tuesday his fondness for Australia and said he hopes to become a citizen.

“I actually like this country and want to become a citizen,” he told the Australian Financial Review, saying he was particularly impressed with plans to roll out a national broadband network across the country.

Wozniak, who quit Apple in 1987 after 12 years, told local radio in Brisbane last week that he enjoyed his regular visits to Australia.

“I am… on the way to become an Australian citizen, that’s a littleknown fact,” he told station 4BC on Friday after queuing up to buy the new generation iPhone 5.

“It turns out that I get to keep my American citizenship,” he added.

“I intend, you know who knows what will follow through in the next five years, I intend to call myself an Australian and feel an Australian, and study the history and become, you know, as much of a real citizen here as I can.”

In the interview with the Financial Review, Wozniak said the national broadband network was one of the reasons he wants to become a citizen.

Australia’s ambitious Aus$35.9 billion ($37.4 billion) National Broadband Network (NBN) aims to connect all Australians to superfast Internet by 2021 in a move the government hopes will transform the country’s economy.

Wozniak said his home in California was not connected to a broadband service and there was no “political idea” to bring it to everyone in the United States.

“There’s only one set of wires to be on and I’m not going to pull strings to get them to do something special for me,” he said.

Under the NBN scheme, 93 percent of homes, schools and businesses will be linked by fibre optic while those in more remote regions of the vast nation will receive their service by fixed wireless and satellite technologies.

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
By commenting, you agree to our terms of service
and to abide by our commenting policy.
 
Google+