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Jon Hubbard of Arkansas Has Some Ideas

By Amanda Marcotte
Tuesday, October 9, 2012 10:47 EDT
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I’m beginning to suspect the Republican Party exists mainly to cause rational people to say, “The fuck?!” at least once a day. In order to accomplish this mission, they are filling the state houses across the country with dudes whose sole purpose in life appears to be seeing how low voters in red states will go in order to vote Republican. Today’s example: Arkansas State Rep. Jon Hubbard, who signed his name to some truly mind-bendingly evil beliefs. As reported by the Arkansas Times:

Slavery was good for black people:

“… the institution of slavery that the black race has long believed to be an abomination upon its people may actually have been a blessing in disguise. The blacks who could endure those conditions and circumstances would someday be rewarded with citizenship in the greatest nation ever established upon the face of the Earth.” (Pages 183-89)

If you think slavery was bad, you should have seen Africa:

African Americans must “understand that even while in the throes of slavery, their lives as Americans are likely much better than they ever would have enjoyed living in sub-Saharan Africa.”“Knowing what we know today about life on the African continent, would an existence spent in slavery have been any crueler than a life spent in sub-Saharan Africa?” (Pages 93 and 189)

Black people are ignorant:

“Wouldn’t life for blacks in America today be more enjoyable and successful if they would only learn to appreciate the value of a good education?” (Page 184)

Integration was bad for white people

“… one of the stated purposes of school integration was to bring black students up to a level close to that of white students. But, to the great disappointment of everyone, the results of this theory worked exactly in reverse of its intended purpose, and instead of black students rising to the educational levels previously attained by white students, the white students dropped to the level of black students. To make matters worse the lack of discipline and ambition of black students soon became shared by their white classmates, and our educational system has been in a steady decline ever since.” (Page 27)

It’s basically hopeless.

“… will it ever become possible for black people in the United States of America to firmly establish themselves as inclusive and contributing members of society within this country?” (Page 187)

Immigration is bad.

..the immigration issue, both legal and illegal… will lead to planned wars or extermination. Although now this seems to be barbaric and uncivilized, it will at some point become as necessary as eating and breathing.” (Page 9)

Don’t forget Nazi Germany.

“American Christians are assuming a similar stance as did the citizens of Germany during Hitler’s rise to power.” (Page 158)

It’s tempting to believe that it’s just a matter of the voters seeing that (R) by a candidate’s name and pulling the lever mindlessly, without knowing what they’re voting for. But that’s way too optimistic. I’ve heard many variations on these kinds of sentiments from a huge variety of Republicans in my life, and in fact, in my experience, a Republican is more likely than not to express these ideas. Especially the men. Needless to say, it’s this sort of idiocy that led to the shameful display on Fox News a week ago. (The comments on the article swiftly demonstrate how eager and unashamed so many conservative dudes are to start spouting jaw-droppingly racist nonsense. But a lot of people defend my point and denounce Hannity and Carlson, so it’s not all bad.)

I highly recommend reading the entire article, because you not only get an eyeball of crazy-racist Republicanism, but also of course of Old Testament patriarchy-style Republicanism (which is quite compatible, as both really see white men as the rightful lords and owners of everyone else). But that’s where we’re at with modern Republicans, I’m afraid. There’s a real willingness to burn this country to the ground rather than have it turn into one where equality is valued.

Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte is a freelance journalist born and bred in Texas, but now living in the writer reserve of Brooklyn. She focuses on feminism, national politics, and pop culture, with the order shifting depending on her mood and the state of the nation.
 
 
 
 
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