Quantcast

Clint Eastwood makes TV ad for Mitt Romney

By Agence France-Presse
Wednesday, October 24, 2012 16:08 EDT
google plus icon
Hollywood legend Clint Eastwood, pictured at the Republican National Convention in August 2012 (AFP)
 
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Email this page

Hollywood legend Clint Eastwood made Mitt Romney’s day Wednesday, urging Americans to join him in supporting the Republican White House challenger in a TV ad against President Barack Obama.

The gruff-voiced “Dirty Harry” star said four more years of Obama would mean four more years of policies that have left America “knocked down,” with 23 million people unable to find work.

“Our country just couldn’t survive that,” said Eastwood, 82. “We need someone who can turn it around fast. That man is Mitt Romney. There is not much time left and the future of our country is at stake.”

The pro-Republican ad was part of a $12.6 million ad buy from American Crossroads, a so-called super PAC outside group that can accept and spend unlimited contributions, that includes two other spots.

“Bow” pounces on Obama’s China policy — “The more Obama borrows from China, the more we’ll have to bow to China,” a narrator says — while “Survive” targets his alleged lack of support for small business.

The 30-second ads are set to air in seven hotly contested states ahead of the November 6 vote.

Eastwood, whose baseball drama “Trouble with the Curve” is now playing in theaters, rocked the Republican convention in August with an improvised conversation that featured an absent Obama represented by an empty chair.

Earlier in the year, he narrated a patriotic Chrysler car commercial during the Super Bowl — “It’s halftime in America (and) the world’s gonna hear the roar of our engines” — that pundits read as an implicit plug for Obama.

Super PACs are political action committees whose often brash partisan ads fall outside regular election spending rules.

One of the co-founders of American Crossroads, Republican political strategist Karl Rove, engineered George W. Bush’s presidential wins.

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
By commenting, you agree to our terms of service
and to abide by our commenting policy.
 
Google+