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U.S. tightens restrictions on soot emissions by 20 percent

By Agence France-Presse
Friday, December 14, 2012 16:17 EDT
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AFP. In a traditional ceremony, a Hungarian girl covers her face with soot in a village west of Budapest on February 5, 2008. The United States on Friday tightened standards on emissions of soot from industry and vehicles by 20 percent, predicting that the regulations would avert thousands of deaths. Image via AFP
 
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The United States on Friday tightened standards on emissions of soot from industry and vehicles by 20 percent, predicting that the regulations would avert thousands of deaths.

The Environmental Protection Agency, in its first major announcement since President Barack Obama’s re-election, ordered stricter rules on so-called fine particle pollution that can easily pass into people’s lungs.

“Families across the country will benefit from the simple fact of being able to breath cleaner air,” Lisa Jackson, the head of the agency, told reporters on a conference call.

“More children will be able to go outside and play with their friends without fear of triggering an asthma attack,” she said.

The agency said that the new standards on diesel vehicles and equipment would prevent up to 40,000 premature deaths and 4.7 million days of sick time at work by 2030.

Implementation of the regulations will require anywhere from $53-350 million, the agency said, but it estimated that the cost would be far outweighed by health benefits worth $4-9 billion a year.

The agency ordered fine particle pollution of no more than 12 micrograms per cubic meter on an annual average, down from the current limit of 15 micrograms.

Jackson said that 66 of the more than 3,000 counties in the United States were not believed to meet the new standard and that only seven — all in California — were not on track to meet the rules by 2020.

The Environmental Protection Agency is a favorite target of conservative Republicans, who oppose its efforts to fight climate change by ordering reductions of greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.

Michael Halpern of the Union of Concerned Scientists, a pressure group that urges policies based on science, was upbeat about the agency’s soot rules.

“It could be that the Obama administration’s backbone is growing stronger now that we’re past the election. Hopefully this means that the administration will side with the science on other issues, too,” he wrote in a blog.

Jackson said that the agency was responding to a court-ordered deadline to revisit its standards set under the landmark 1963 Clean Air Act.

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
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