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The group ‘Reformed Whores’ presents an important PSA: ‘Girls poop, too’

By David Ferguson
Tuesday, January 8, 2013 15:14 EDT
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Girls poop too
 
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In this video, a group called “Reformed Whores,” made up of actor/musicians Marie Cecile Anderson and Katie Frame, perform the song “Girls Poop Too,” which is, to quote Anderson in the lyrics, intended to clear up a “common misconception/around the subject of a lady’s rectum,” the belief by many men that women do not actually defecate.

“Yup, you heard us right,” added Frame.  ”Girls poop, too.”

“Girls poop, too,” goes the chorus over a bouncy Country and Western shuffle, “This message is long overdue/Whoever said we don’t/ain’t got a clue.”

“Don’t be scared, it’s natural, t’ain’t taboo,” they insist, wearing white lab coats and showing scenes of men reduced to tears by the realization that their wives, girlfriends and sisters actually do have functioning alimentary tracts.

Raw Story spoke to Anderson and Frame, whose album “Ladies Don’t Spit” is currently out on iTunes and Spotify.  Anderson is from Tennessee and Frame hails from Maryland.  The two women met in Brooklyn, NY and realized they shared a common love of country music.

“We’re definitely influenced by Patsy Cline and all those great old acts,” Frame said.  ”We were thinking of that Johnny Cash vibe, almost like singspiel, kind of singing-talking.”

When asked why they’d want to take on such a…sensitive topic as female defecation, both women laughed and said they like the idea of breaking taboos and flying in the face of traditional “ladylike” behavior.

“I think it’s just one of those things that people don’t want to admit to,” said Frame, “so we wrote the song about it.”

Country music has long been a medium of vivid stories and a window on working-class southern culture.  Raw Story asked Reformed Whores if they feel they are part of a tradition of female country singers taking on controversial topics as a road to empowerment.  In 1975, for example, Loretta Lynn released the song “The Pill,” which was about a woman taking charge of her reproductive choices.

“Well, that’s a huge honor to us,” said Anderson, “and to what we’re paying homage to.  We love Loretta Lynn and Dolly Parton and we just think that not only were they amazing musicians, but Minnie Pearl and Dolly Parton, they were really strong women, but also comedians.”

Anyone who remembers Minnie Pearl and the price tags perpetually dangling from her outlandish hats can attest to that.

Most audiences enjoy their irreverence, but occasionally they notice someone in the audience who is less than enthused.

“Every so often,” Frame said, “whenever we do the song, there’ll be that one guy in the audience who does not want to hear it.  We love that the most, so we’ll just sing our hearts out to that person, because he or she needs to hear it.”

Reformed Whores will be playing in Chicago on January 10, 11 and 12, and in Charleston, South Carolina January 18 and 19.  For full venue and showtime information, go to Reformed Whores’ website.

Watch the video, embedded via YouTube, below:

David Ferguson
David Ferguson
David Ferguson is an editor at Raw Story. He was previously writer and radio producer in Athens, Georgia, hosting two shows for Georgia Public Broadcasting and blogging at Firedoglake.com and elsewhere. He is currently working on a book.
 
 
 
 
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