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Radio host: Women on birth control pill have wombs ‘embedded’ with ‘little tiny fetuses’

By Samantha Kimmey
Friday, February 1, 2013 21:36 EDT
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Birth control pills via Shutterstock
 
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Conservative radio host Kevin Swanson claimed Friday that “certain doctors and certain scientists that have done research on women’s wombs after they’ve gone through the surgery” found “little tiny fetuses” were “embedded” into the wombs of women on birth control pills, according to Right Wing Watch.

But his guest — who made an anti-contraception documentary, Birth Control: How Did We Get Here? — wouldn’t say that he agreed, only, “We’ve actually heard on both sides of that. We’re researching that and want to make sure we speak correctly to that in our second film. But we have medical advice on both sides of the table there, so we want to make sure that we communicate that properly.”

Some antiabortion advocates claim that birth control can prevent fertilized eggs from implantation, which they say means it is an abortofacient.

The New York Times examined the issue last summer and found that while labels for emergency contraception — which contain high doses of hormones found in other birth control pills — claimed the medication could prevent implantation, “Studies have not established that emergency contraceptive pills prevent fertilized eggs from implanting in the womb, leading scientists say.”

The American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which opposes abortion, also wrote in 1999 that “there is no credible evidence to validate a mechanism of pre-implantation abortion as a part of the action of hormone contraceptives.”

A study released last October found that free birth control leads to a significant decrease in abortions, reported CBS News. The tidy, lead by Dr. Jeffrey Peipert of Washington University in St. Louis, found that the abortion rate for the 9,000 women in St. Louis involved in the study was between 4.4 to 7.5 per 1,000 women. The average is between 13.4 and 17 per 1,000 for women in St. Louis generally.

Listen to the clip, via RWW, below.

[Image: Birth control pills via Shutterstock]

 
 
 
 
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