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NAACP’s Julian Bond to Colbert: Scalia is Limbaugh of Supreme Court

By David Ferguson
Thursday, March 7, 2013 9:20 EDT
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Julian Bond via screencap
 
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Civil Rights pioneer and NAACP President Emeritus Julian Bond joined Stephen Colbert on Wednesday night to discuss the current challenges to the Voting Rights Act, the landmark 1965 legislation that cleared away hurdles to voting for African Americans in states with a history of discrimination. Bond was candid with his opinions on certain Supreme Court justices, including Antonin Scalia, who he called the “Rush Limbaugh” of the court, and Justice Clarence Thomas, who he called “wrong.”

“So, now that racism is over,” Colbert said to Bond, “what do you plan on doing with your free time? Take some pottery classes? Hot yoga?”

Bond replied that, if anything, racism has increased since President Barack Obama took office.

The conversation moved on to the Voting Rights Act (VRA), which right-leaning Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia called a perpetuation of “racial entitlement.”

Of Scalia, Bond said, “He is the Rush Limbaugh of the Supreme Court. He says inappropriate things over and over again, most recently about the Voting Rights Act.”

Colbert invoked another justice, Clarence Thomas, saying, “You’ve got Georgia roots, Clarence Thomas has Georgia roots. How come the two of you see this so differently?”

“I think Justice Thomas and I have lived different lives and we’ve drawn different lessons from the lives we’ve lived,” Bond said. “He thinks this way and I think that way and I’m right.”

Watch the video, embedded below via Comedy Central:

David Ferguson
David Ferguson
David Ferguson is an editor at Raw Story. He was previously writer and radio producer in Athens, Georgia, hosting two shows for Georgia Public Broadcasting and blogging at Firedoglake.com and elsewhere. He is currently working on a book.
 
 
 
 
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