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Chinese man kills two ‘one-child’ policy officials

By Agence France-Presse
Tuesday, July 23, 2013 8:27 EDT
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A Chinese dairy has been ordered to suspend production after a cancer-causing toxin was found in its infant formula, China's quality watchdog said Monday, in the country's latest milk scare. Ava Dairy Co. Ltd has started a recall after high levels of aflatoxin, which is caused by mould, was found in products made between July and December, the watchdog said, according to the official Xinhua news agency. The affected formula was mainly sold to supermarkets in Hunan and Guangdong, said Li Yuanping, spokesman for China's General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine. China is trying to crack down on product safety violations to reassure citizens and restore faith in the government after a series of high-profile scandals. The latest case comes just a month after dairy maker Yili began recalling batches of baby formula when authorities found they contained high levels of mercury. And in December, aflatoxin was found in milk produced by another leading dairy company, Mengniu Dairy Group. Milk was at the centre of China's biggest food safety scandal in 2008 when the industrial chemical melamine was found to have been illegally added to dairy products to give the appearance of higher protein content. At least six babies died and another 300,000 became ill after drinking milk tainted with melamine. Aflatoxins can be found in milk after cows consume feed contaminated by mould and can increase the risk of cancer, including liver cancer, according to the World Health Organisation.
 
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A knife-wielding man stormed an office enforcing China’s one-child policy on Tuesday, stabbing two officials to death and injuring four people after a row over his offspring, state media said.

Bureau staff had earlier refused to give the man, surnamed He, the papers he needed to obtain a residency permit for his fourth child, the official Xinhua news agency said, as he had not paid a “social compensation fee” for having it in violation of the family planning policy.

The villager was arrested soon after attacking the Dongxing city family planning office in the southern province of Guangxi, the People’s Daily said.

Video posted by the web portal Sina showed a man fending off a group of police before being overpowered. The footage, apparently taken by a bystander, could not be independently verified.

China’s policy of limiting most families to one child has sown deep resentment since it was imposed more than three decades ago.

Authorities say it has prevented overpopulation and boosted economic development.

But critics argue the policy has led to harsh enforcement methods that incite popular anger as well as creating major demographic problems.

Some users of the Chinese version of Twitter, Sina Weibo, expressed sympathy for Tuesday’s attacker.

“As long as family planning serves as a means to persecute the people, the people must resist,” wrote one. “How many more people will turn to crime because of this terrible law?”

Outrage spread online last year after a woman who had been forced to undergo an abortion seven months into her pregnancy was pictured alongside the bloody foetus.

The one-child policy allows exceptions for some families, including many ethnic minorities, couples who are both only children and rural families whose first child is a girl.

Nonetheless the limit — coupled with a traditional preference for boys — has led to an imbalance of about six males born for every five females.

The country’s labour pool shrank last year for the first time since 1963, according to official figures, while a growing elderly population and their need for care has put pressure on only children and the state.

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
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