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Watch: Why you should be very worried about the DEA’s spy program

By Eric W. Dolan
Monday, August 5, 2013 19:24 EDT
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Matthew Feeney of Reason (Screenshot)
 
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Matthew Feeney, assistant editor for Reason 24/7, on Monday explained why the Drug Enforcement Administration’s surveillance program violated the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

He argued on RT America that the program robbed defendants of their right to a fair trial.

“I think any constitutional system that is supposed to support civil liberties should allow citizens when they’re charged for a crime to actually view the evidence presented against them,” Feeney said. “But this doesn’t allow for that at all… agents from the DEA are encouraged to in effect just sort of make up or to re-create the evidence against people being charged with crimes, and that should worry people.”

Documents obtained by Reuters showed the Special Operations Division within the DEA was amassing data on Americans with help from the NSA, CIA, FBI, IRS and Department of Homeland Security.

The massive database has been used by local authorities across the nation to secretly launch criminal investigations. In a process dubbed “parallel construction,” the local authorities were instructed to lie about where their evidence originated.

“The DEA increasingly qualifies as a rogue agency – one that Congress needs to immediately investigate,” said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “This latest scandal may well be just the tip of the iceberg.”

Watch video, uploaded to YouTube, below:

Eric W. Dolan
Eric W. Dolan
Eric W. Dolan has served as an editor for Raw Story since August 2010, and is based out of Sacramento, California. He grew up in the suburbs of Chicago and received a Bachelor of Science from Bradley University. Eric is also the publisher and editor of PsyPost. You can follow him on Twitter @ewdolan.
 
 
 
 
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