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California Representative believes ‘for a criminal practice, there has to be a gun’

By Scott Kaufman
Thursday, August 15, 2013 15:15 EDT
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Representative McClintock (R-CA)
 
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On Tuesday, Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA) informed constituents at a town hall meeting in El Dorado Hills that all crime require the presence of a firearm.

Responding to a question about his position on “Wall Street criminal practices,” McClintock said “for a criminal practice, there has to be a gun. It’s pretty simple. You can get somebody to do anything with a gun. When I hear about predatory lending, for example, my first question is, ‘Well that’s just terrible, you shouldn’t be allowed to force somebody to take out a loan they don’t want.’”

McClintock’s record with respect to the only object capable of supposedly criminalizing a practice is long. He has supported legislation requiring states to recognize concealed carry permits issued in other states, exempting guns from the property of people who declare bankruptcy, and allowing loaded firearms to be carried in national parks. In the past, he has likened gun control legislation to the government preemptively “amputat[ing] your fist so that you can never strike my nose.”

His opposition to any restrictions on the ability to purchase or carry a firearm extends from his belief that individual Americans — including those who work on Wall Street — must take responsibility for their actions. “Bad decisions,” he insists, are “the price we pay for the freedom to make all of the good decisions in our lives.”

Watch the video of the exchange here, via ThinkProgress:

["Water and Power Subcommittee Hearing on hydroelectric power development" via repmcclintock on Flickr.]

Scott Kaufman
Scott Kaufman
Scott Eric Kaufman is the proprietor of the AV Club's Internet Film School and, in addition to Raw Story, also writes for Lawyers, Guns & Money. He earned a Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of California, Irvine in 2008.
 
 
 
 
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