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One fifth of CIA job applicants with suspect backgrounds have ‘significant terrorist’ connections: Washington Post

By Agence France-Presse
Monday, September 2, 2013 8:17 EDT
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Al-Qaeda and other hostile groups have repeatedly sought to infiltrate US intelligence agencies, which are investigating thousands of their employees to counter the threat, The Washington Post reported on Monday.

The CIA found that about a fifth of job applicants with suspect backgrounds had “significant terrorist and/or hostile intelligence connections,” the Post cited a classified budget document as saying.

The document was provided to the paper by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, now a fugitive in Russia under temporary asylum.

Although the file did not describe the nature of the jobseekers’ extremist or hostile ties, it cited Hamas, Hezbollah and Al-Qaeda and its affiliates most often.

The fear of infiltration is such that the NSA planned last year to investigate at least 4,000 staff who obtained security clearances.

The NSA detected potentially suspicious activity among staff members after trawling through trillions of employee keystrokes at work.

The suspicious behavior included staffers accessing classified databases they do not usually use for their work or downloading several documents, two people familiar with the software used to monitor staff told the Post.

Al-Qaeda and other hostile groups have repeatedly sought to infiltrate US intelligence agencies, which are investigating thousands of their employees to counter the threat, The Washington Post reported on Monday.

The CIA found that about a fifth of job applicants with suspect backgrounds had “significant terrorist and/or hostile intelligence connections,” the Post cited a classified budget document as saying.

The document was provided to the paper by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, now a fugitive in Russia under temporary asylum.

Although the file did not describe the nature of the jobseekers’ extremist or hostile ties, it cited Hamas, Hezbollah and Al-Qaeda and its affiliates most often.

The fear of infiltration is such that the NSA planned last year to investigate at least 4,000 staff who obtained security clearances.

The NSA detected potentially suspicious activity among staff members after trawling through trillions of employee keystrokes at work.

The suspicious behavior included staffers accessing classified databases they do not usually use for their work or downloading several documents, two people familiar with the software used to monitor staff told the Post.

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
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