Quantcast

Hiroshi Yamauchi, who built Nintendo gaming empire, dies at 85

By Agence France-Presse
Thursday, September 19, 2013 9:46 EDT
google plus icon
Former Nintendo president Hiroshi Yamauchi (AFP)
 
  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Email this page

Hiroshi Yamauchi, credited with transforming Nintendo from a family-owned Japanese business into a global byword for video games, died Thursday from pneumonia. He was 85.

Yamauchi was just 22 when he took over the family business from his ailing grandfather and he went on to head the firm for over half a century.

It was during his tenure — in 1983 — that Nintendo released a games console called the “Family Computer”, which laid the foundations for the modern video-game industry.

Known abroad as the “Nintendo Entertainment System”, the early console became an international phenomenon with the company’s global success skyrocketing on the back of the legendary Super Mario series.

A string of successful game software titles followed while the popular Game Boy hand-held console was released to popular acclaim in 1989.

Yamauchi, whose death was reported by Japanese media, was born in the ancient capital of Kyoto into a family that operated a maker of Japanese and Western playing cards.

He was a 22-year-old student at Tokyo’s Waseda University when he took over the family business in 1949.

Yamauchi started Japan’s first mass production of plastic playing cards and took the company public.

After running Nintendo for 53 years, Yamauchi stepped aside in 2002 as he brought in current chief Satoru Iwata.

Yamauchi’s death comes just two days after Eiji Toyoda, a member of Toyota’s founding family who oversaw the automaker’s global ascent and helped drive a revolutionary production process, died at the age of 100.

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
By commenting, you agree to our terms of service
and to abide by our commenting policy.
 
Google+