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Fascism Is Letting People Know A Government Service Exists?

By Amanda Marcotte
Wednesday, November 27, 2013 14:35 EDT
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Don’t even look at the computer, or you will be sucked into a mind control cult of people who believe they should benefit from the taxes they pay.

Happy day-before-Thanksgiving. What are the wingnuts completely bent out of shape about today? Oh dear, that the evil Obama is pushing his “agenda” on people for the holiday? Oh noes!

Here’s a crazy idea: Treat your family members as people you love and appreciate — or at least tolerate — instead of targets for political conversion. You only get one or two families in this life — the one you’re born into, and the one you marry into. Maybe if you’re lucky, you become “like a son” or “like a sister” to another. There’s a lot to talk about in this world beyond politics, and chances are you’re not going to persuade disagreeing relatives, anyway.

A healthy society does not feature a leader who sends messages to his followers, asking them to make a pledge to have a conversation with their families about his agenda at Thanksgiving. This is cult-like.

That is so scary! Unfortunately, Jim Geraghty, who wrote the original piece, made the dumbass mistake of linking the item he claims is “cult-like” indoctrination into a political point of view. Here is the horrible, cult-like message he’s so worried about:

This holiday season, millions of Americans have a chance to get quality, affordable health insurance—many for the first time. If you have family members who are uninsured, you can play a big part in helping them find coverage that works for them. It might not always seem like it, but your family listens to you. So have the talk.

Oh. It’s not about defending or debating the ACA at all. It’s about, if you have family members who are uninsured, sitting them down and saying, “Hey, folks, let’s use this time to get you signed up for health insurance.” No debate about Obama, the ACA, or anything required. Indeed, there are some actual conservatives who, despite objecting to the ACA, are still needing some health insurance and might be inclined to sign up where they can get it more affordably. It never even occurs to Geraghty that someone might just not know and could use a little help.

This is where we’re at: Conservatives are objecting to the fact that the government is advertising that it provides a service. How far are they willing to take this? Should national parks and schools take their signs down? Should there be no websites telling you how to get to your Social Security office? If you need a passport, should you be required to know a guy who knows a guy who can take you down a dark alley where you can get this service? The entire complaint here is that taxpayers who are paying for a service are being alerted to the fact that they can use the service. Seriously, he compares this to fascism. Which means that getting a pamphlet in the mail alerting you to where your voting booth is, I guess, is “fascism” now. Since advertising existing services is the worst possible thing you can do.

That is dumber than an Adam Sandler movie. If you object to the existence of the service, just do that. Don’t object to the fact that people are talking about the fact that the service exists. Alerting a relative to the existence of the health care exchanges is no more indoctrination into a cult than a road sign pointing you to the road that your tax dollars built is. That this is the focus of outrage shows how much conservatives, enraged at the possibility that The Poors might get health care, have lost their motehrfucking minds.

Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte
Amanda Marcotte is a freelance journalist born and bred in Texas, but now living in the writer reserve of Brooklyn. She focuses on feminism, national politics, and pop culture, with the order shifting depending on her mood and the state of the nation.
 
 
 
 
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