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Four bodies from crashed U.S. Air Force helicopter recovered in Britain

By Agence France-Presse
Thursday, January 9, 2014 12:24 EDT
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Helicopter via AFP
 
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The bodies of four members of the US Air Force whose helicopter crashed while training in eastern England were recovered from marshland on Thursday, police said.

Their bodies were taken to a nearby hospital by private ambulance for a post-mortem examination, Norfolk police said.

It will take many more weeks to recover all the parts of the destroyed chopper from an area the size of a football pitch, and a security cordon will remain in place during that time.

Police have said there was no evidence that the crash, which happened on Tuesday, was due to criminal activity. The investigation has been handed over to the USAF with Britain’s Ministry of Defence.

US Captains Christopher S. Stover and Sean M. Ruane, Technical Sergeant Dale E. Mathews and female Staff Sergeant Afton M. Ponce died when their Pave Hawk came down near the Norfolk village of Cley-next-the-Sea.

The helicopter was carrying live ammunition and bullets that were strewn around the crash site, but local police chief Bob Sully said there was no immediate threat to the public as long as people respected the cordon.

Their bodies were taken to a nearby hospital by private ambulance for a post-mortem examination, Norfolk police said.

It will take many more weeks to recover all the parts of the destroyed chopper from an area the size of a football pitch, and a security cordon will remain in place during that time.

Police have said there was no evidence that the crash, which happened on Tuesday, was due to criminal activity. The investigation has been handed over to the USAF with Britain’s Ministry of Defence.

US Captains Christopher S. Stover and Sean M. Ruane, Technical Sergeant Dale E. Mathews and female Staff Sergeant Afton M. Ponce died when their Pave Hawk came down near the Norfolk village of Cley-next-the-Sea.

The helicopter was carrying live ammunition and bullets that were strewn around the crash site, but local police chief Bob Sully said there was no immediate threat to the public as long as people respected the cordon.

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
AFP journalists cover wars, conflicts, politics, science, health, the environment, technology, fashion, entertainment, the offbeat, sports and a whole lot more in text, photographs, video, graphics and online.
 
 
 
 
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