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Malaysia Airlines mystery: China releases satellite photos of ‘suspected crash area at sea’

By Arturo Garcia
Wednesday, March 12, 2014 18:18 EDT
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Malaysia Airlines plane [Facebook]
 
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Chinese officials released satellite images on Wednesday suggesting a breakthrough in the case of a missing Malaysia Airlines flight, CNN reported.

China’s State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense said the photos of “three suspected floating objects and their sizes” were taken at coordinates of 105.63 east longitude, 6.7 north latitude, placing the “suspected crash site at sea” south of Vietnam and northeast of Flight 370′s origin point of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Air traffic officials lost contact with the Beijing-bound flight carrying 239 people onboard early Saturday morning local time. The objects in the new photographs reportedly measure 24 by 22 meters, 14 by 19 meters and 13 by 18 meters.

The BBC reported that China has deployed several high-resolution satellites to aid in the search for the Boeing 777 aircraft, which carried 153 Chinese nationals. But officials also complained that conflicting information has been released as the investigation has proceeded. The search area has reportedly been extended to 35,000 square miles, about 27,000 nautical miles.

“It is very hard for us to decide whether a given piece of information is accurate,” a spokesperson for the Chinese foreign ministry was quoted as saying on Tuesday.

Watch a report on the new satellite images, as aired on CNN on Wednesday, below.

[Image via Malaysia Airlines Facebook page]

Arturo Garcia
Arturo Garcia
Arturo R. García is the managing editor at Racialicious.com. He is based in San Diego, California and has written for both print and broadcast media, including contributions to GlobalComment.com, The Root and Comment Is Free. Follow him on Twitter at @ABoyNamedArt
 
 
 
 
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