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Georgia anti-abortion groups square off in Washington over rape and incest exceptions

By Arturo Garcia
Friday, March 28, 2014 21:21 EDT
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'An Anti-Abortion Protester' [Shutterstock] http://tinyurl.com/lhkklst
 
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Two anti-abortion groups from Georgia will face off against one another this weekend for the right to be their state’s affiliate for the National Right to Life, WSB-TV reported on Friday.

The national organization’s current Georgia branch, Georgia Right To Life, (GRTL) has been challenged by a new group, Georgia Life Alliance (GLA). Both groups will present their argument for membership before the National Right to Life’s board. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that attorney Emily Matson will give Georgia Life Alliance’s presentation Friday evening.

“We are challenging because we believe Georgia Life Alliance can and will more effectively carry out and achieve goals and objectives of National Right to Life than Georgia Right to Life, Inc., is currently doing,” Matson stated in a letter to Georgia Right To Life.

The national board, consisting of 58 members, is expected to render a decision on Saturday.

The disagreement between the two groups reportedly stems from GRTL’s reluctance to support anti-abortion legislation that includes exceptions for rape and incest.

“It’s not about philosophy,” Matson told WSB. “It’s more about the manner and method we achieve our goals.”

However, GRL spokesperson Mike Griffin defended his group’s track record over the course of its long relationship with National Right To Life.

“They say the proof is in the pudding,” Griffin told the Journal-Constitution. “There’s a lot of pudding here. Which begs the question, why the challenge?”

While Matson has not identified members of GLA’s leadership, Fox News contributor Erick Erickson wrote on Friday that he was part of the group, a position inspired by GRTL’s opposition to a ban on abortions after the 20-week mark in a pregnancy.

“Life is too precious and important for political gamesmanship,” the Journal-Constitution quoted him as saying. “And I believe GRTL took that position for other political purposes instead of joining every other pro-life group in America to advance the life agenda down the field.”

Watch WSB’s report on the split between the two groups, as aired on Friday, below.

[Image: "An anti-abortion protester holds a stop sign and the ten commandments on the sidewalk in front of the U.S. Supreme Court On May 14, 2001 In Washington, D.C" by Ryan Rodrick Beiler via Shutterstock.”

Arturo Garcia
Arturo Garcia
Arturo R. García is the managing editor at Racialicious.com. He is based in San Diego, California and has written for both print and broadcast media, including contributions to GlobalComment.com, The Root and Comment Is Free. Follow him on Twitter at @ABoyNamedArt
 
 
 
 
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