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Staggering 76 percent of overweight kids think their weight is fine

Almost one-third of American children and teenagers are either obese or overweight, but a new study carried out by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, found 30 percent of them -- about 9.1 million -- believe they are at the correct weight.…

American doctor infected with Ebola in Liberia outbreak

An American doctor battling West Africa’s Ebola epidemic has himself fallen sick with the disease in Liberia, his aid agency said. Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian charity, said Dr Kent Brantly had been isolated at the group’s Ebola treatment center at the ELWA hospital in the Liberian capital Monrovia. “Dr. Brantly…

New ‘lab on a chip’ that decodes a patient’s DNA within minutes makes preventing illness possible

Greek-Cypriot engineer wins European Inventor Award for USB device that decodes patient’s DNA within minutes outside a lab There was a time when the closest Christofer Toumazou thought he would get to the hallowed halls of Imperial College in London was when he was walking down Exhibition road on the…

The number of ‘hot days’ are on the rise: See your city

This is the warmest time of year in most of the U.S. And if we continue to pump heat-trapping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, it’s going to get even warmer — not only in the summer, but throughout the year.…

A cosmic two-step: the universal dance of the dwarf galaxies

Over the last few years we’ve been studying the orbits of dwarf galaxies and we expecting to find them buzzing at random around large galaxies. But looking out into the universe, we see some dwarfs undertaking an orderly dance with others, in coherent, well-defined orbits. Such orbits are completely unexpected…

Why cold-blooded animals don’t need to wrap up to keep warm

By Anwesha Ghosh, University of Rochester Animals have evolved to occupy almost all corners of the Earth. To survive, no matter the weather outside, they all need temperature-sensitive bodily reactions to work. This is easy for warm-blooded animals, such as humans, because they have the ability to maintain their body…

Male circumcision lowers HIV risk for women, world AIDS forum told

A campaign to promote male circumcision to prevent AIDS infection also indirectly benefits women by reducing their risk of contracting the HIV virus, according to a study presented at the world AIDS forum Friday. In a South African community where large numbers of men had been circumcised, women who only…

Shipwreck excavation may explain 349-year-old mystery of how warship blew itself up

Cotswold Archaeology and local divers hope to solve mystery of how the warship London sank off the Southend coast A major underwater rescue excavation is being mounted this summer by English Heritage to solve a 349-year-old mystery: how warship the London managed to blow itself up without firing a shot…

First case of ebola death reported in Africa’s most populous city of Lagos

Death marks new and alarming cross-border development in world’s biggest epidemic spreading across three countries A man has died of ebola in Lagos, the first confirmed case of the highly contagious and deadly virus in Africa’s most populous metropolis. Patrick Sawyer, a 40-year-old Liberian civil servant, collapsed on arrival in…

Australian researchers pioneer ‘Google Street View’ of galaxies

A new home-grown instrument based on bundles of optical fibers is giving Australian astronomers the first 'Google street view' of the cosmos — incredibly detailed views of huge numbers of galaxies. …

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