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Coal plants lock in 300 billion tons of CO2 emissions

Originally published at Climate Central It seems straightforward to say that when you buy a new car by taking out a loan, you’re committing to spending a certain amount of your income per month on that car for a specific period of time. Of course, by buying that car, you’re…

Massive 4,000-year-old wine cellar reveals the wild nights of ancient Canaanites

By Karlena Tomc-Barbosa, Durham University The discovery of a 4,000-year-old wine cellar in Israel has provided the best direct evidence yet of the raucous, boozy celebrations that were a key part of the region’s culture at the time. The cellar was found during a recent excavation at Tel Kabri, Israel,…

Experts dispute claim that panda faked pregnancy to get more bamboo

Claims that a six-year-old panda faked signs of pregnancy in order to receive better treatment from her conservation centre carers have been debunked by one of China’s leading panda experts. China’s state newswire Xinhua reported on Tuesday that Ai Hin may have deliberately demonstrated tell-tale signs of panda pregnancy, including “reduced…

Neuroscientists say it’s possible to overwrite bad memories

Emotions connected to memories can be rewritten, making bad events in the past seem better and good things appear worse, scientists from Japan and the United States have found. The discovery of the mechanism behind the process helps to explain the power of current psychotherapeutic treatments for mental illnesses such…

‘We have glimpsed the Sun’s soul’: Underground solar lab detects low-energy neutrinos

A lab sited under 1.4 kilometres (4,500 feet) of rock has detected particles from the Sun that help to measure activity at the very heart of our star, scientists said Wednesday. Deep beneath Italy’s Apennine Mountains, the laboratory recorded low-energy neutrinos spewed out by the fusion of hydrogen protons, the…

NASA estimates new heavy-lift rocket will have first test flight in November 2018

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. (Reuters) – NASA’s new heavy-lift rocket, designed to fly astronauts to the moon, asteroids and eventually Mars, likely will not have its debut test flight until November 2018, nearly a year later than previous estimates, agency officials said on Wednesday. NASA is 70 percent…

What global warming might mean for extreme snowfalls

Originally published at Climate Central So if the world is warming, that means winters should be less snowy, right? Well, it’s a bit more complicated than that. OK, it’s a lot more complicated. Boston’s North End neighborhood amid the snow drifts after a February 2013 blizzard. Credit: Twitter via Matt Meister.…

Virus pioneer warns of Ebola ‘perfect storm’: Everything is there for it to snowball

Peter Piot, the Belgian scientist who co-discovered the Ebola virus in 1976, on Tuesday said a “perfect storm” in West Africa had given the disease a chance to spread unchecked. “We have never seen an (Ebola) epidemic on this scale,” Piot was quoted by the French daily Liberation as saying.…

Will cyborgs turn art into a supersensory futureworld?

Wherever humans live or have lived, you will find art. It looms up on remote Pacific islands and on rocks in the Sahara. For students of human evolution it is what marks the coming of the “modern human mind”: the superb cave art of the last ice age reveals the arrival of homo sapiens…

Dept. of Agriculture: Researchers are close to creating an allergy-free peanut

By Ros Krasny WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A new method for removing allergens from peanuts means help could soon be on the way for the roughly 2.8 million Americans with a potentially life-threatening allergy to the popular food, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Tuesday. In a blog post, the…

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