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Climate change drives boom in tree-killing beetle population: study

Climate change is causing a population boom in a species of tree-killing beetles across a major swath of north America, according to new research published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The higher-than-usual temperatures and light rainfall over the last decade have allowed the mountain pine beetle…

David Attenborough first to capture on film newly-discovered Galapagos pink iguana

Veteran British nature broadcaster David Attenborough is to show the first filmed sighting of the rare pink iguana, in a television series on the Galapagos Islands which begins Tuesday. The 86-year-old filmed the rare Conolophus Marthae iguana in June last year for his new series “Galapagos 3D”, which goes out…

Space travel can accelerate Alzheimer’s: U.S. study

Long journeys into deep space, including a mission to Mars, could expose astronauts to levels of cosmic radiation harmful to the brain and accelerate Alzheimer’s disease, said US research Monday. The NASA-funded study involved bombarding mice with varied radiation doses, including levels comparable to what voyagers would experience during a…

Dried squash holds guillotined French king’s blood: study

Two centuries after the French people beheaded Louis XVI and dipped their handkerchiefs in his blood, scientists believe they have authenticated the remains of one such rag kept as a revolutionary souvenir. Researchers have been trying for years to verify a claim imprinted on an ornately decorated calabash that it…

U.S. regulators approve new tuberculosis drug

U.S. health regulators said Monday they had licensed a new treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis — the first such federal approval aimed at tackling the deadly disease in 40 years. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said it was approving the drug, named Sirturo, as an alternative treatment for adults suffering…

Nobel medicine laureate Levi-Montalcini dies aged 103

Nobel medicine laureate Rita Levi-Montalcini, a neurologist and developmental biologist, died on Sunday at her home in Rome aged 103. She was the oldest living Nobel laureate at the time of her death. Levi-Montalcini shared the prize with colleague Stanley Cohen in 1986 for their ground-breaking discovery of growth factors.…

What to expect from Science in 2013

It is customary to look back at the end of the year, but we can also look ahead to what to expect in 2013 Over the festive period, I ended up watching “Most Shocking Celebrity Moments of 2012“. I didn’t want to, it’s not something I’d ever watch normally, but…

Why don’t more girls study physics?

Almost half of Britain’s co-ed schools have no female students taking A-level physics, but one London school is showing how it is possible to buck the trend. Alice Williams is 16, and her eyes are gleaming. As she speaks, her face grows pink with excitement and her hands wave around…

How NASA gave us the images that shine new light on Earth – and beyond

It’s 50 years since the first interplanetary probe, and this year’s stunning pictures from across the solar system show how far space technology has come This image gives us an unprecedented view of Earth at night. Ribbons of light from cities stretch across the shadows of the world’s great land…

Scientists pinpoint elusive itch nerves: study

A debate over the nature of itchiness has come closer to an answer, reported LiveScience. A study published in Nature Neuroscience found specific nerve cells that detect itchy sensations but do not also detect pain, helping to answer the question of whether itchiness is just a kind of pain. Some…

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