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Light-powered magnetic levitation could create ‘new class’ of solar energy

In a breakthrough that could one day revolutionize transportation and electricity generation, scientists at the University in Kanagawa in Japan demonstrated this month a disc that spins at over 200 rotations per minute when placed over a magnet in direct sunlight, saying the discovery could help create a wholly “new…

Rebirth of the Viking warship that may have helped conquer the seas

When the sleek, beautiful silhouette of Roskilde 6 appeared on the horizon, 1,000 years ago, it was very bad news. The ship was part of a fleet carrying an army of hungry, thirsty warriors, muscles toned by rowing and sailing across the North Sea; a war machine like nothing else…

Earth’s twin will be discovered in 2013, astronomers predict

Humanity is likely to discover its first truly Earth-like planet in 2013, according to the director of the Planetary Habitability Laboratory of the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo. “I’m very positive that the first Earth twin will be discovered next year,” Abel Mendez told Space.com. Mendez is leading the…

British scientists abandon plan to drill for 2-mile deep Arctic lake

British scientists halt project to take samples from lake entombed under 3km of ice after drilling fails to go according to plan An ambitious plan by a team of British scientists at the Antarctic to look for life in a lake buried under almost 2 miles of ice was abandoned this week,…

Higgs boson theorist criticizes Richard Dawkins over anti-religious ‘fundamentalism’

Higgs boson theorist says he agrees with those who find Dawkins’ approach to dealing with believers ‘embarrassing’ As public disagreements go, few can have boasted such heavy-hitting antagonists. On one side is Richard Dawkins, the celebrated biologist who has made a second career demonstrating his epic disdain for religion. On…

Study: Coral reefs decimated by Chinese economic boom

China’s economic boom has seen its coral reefs shrink by at least 80 percent over the past 30 years, according to a joint Australian study, with researchers describing “grim” levels of damage and loss. Scientists from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and the South…

Childhood obesity rates show signs of decreasing in U.S.

A recent study shows that rates of childhood obesity in the U.S. may be slowing. According to Scientific American (SA), after years of ever-increasing numbers, a survey of 26.7 million young children from low-income families showed that, for this group of children, the surging national rates of obesity may at…

Archeologists complete ‘most important’ excavation in 80 years: 900-seat Roman arts center

Arts centre discovered under one of Rome’s busiest roundabouts was built in 123 AD and could seat 900 people Archeologists who have completed the excavation of a 900-seat arts centre under one of Rome’s busiest roundabouts are calling it the most important Roman discovery in 80 years. The centre, built…

Saving the rhino with U.S. military surveillance drones

South African farmer plans to put 30 drones in the air to help combat poachers A rhino farmer in South Africa is planning to use surveillance drones designed for the US military to combat poachers who are driving the animals towards extinction. Clive Vivier, cofounder of the Zululand rhino reserve in…

Does Einstein’s brain hold the secret to his genius?

A new study of the great physicist’s brain received a huge amount of media coverage, but some aren’t convinced by how it has been interpreted Albert Einstein’s brain fascinates scientists and the general public alike, because it may provide clues to the neurological basis of his extraordinary intellectual abilities. The…

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