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Scientists excited by discovery of ‘Underground Galapagos’

Diverse underground ecosystems buried deep beneath the Earth’s crust may offer clues to the origins of life on Earth, several recent studies have revealed. Whether it is tiny worms found wriggling in the depths of a South African mine or micro-organisms discovered six kilometers (3.7 miles) under the surface in…

Stonehenge remains a mystery as scientists ask: was it a health spa or a cemetery?

Archaeologists back conflicting theories on Britain’s greatest prehistoric monument It already attracts more than a million visitors a year. Yet these numbers could be dwarfed once Stonehenge, one of the world’s greatest prehistoric monuments, completes its radical facelift. Over the next year, the nearby A344 will be closed and grassed…

Coronavirus: Is this the next pandemic?

Last September a doctor in a Saudi hospital was fired for reporting a new, deadly strain of the coronavirus. Now, with half of all confirmed cases ending in death, the World Health Organisation has issued a global alert and scientists are preparing for the worst In mid-June last year, Ali Mohamed Zaki,…

Yale scientist tells Bill Moyers we need to end the silence on climate change

In an interview with veteran journalist Bill Moyers on Friday, scientist Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, described the dire need to reinvigorate communities across the globe in the fight against climate change — a subject Leiserowitz says is as much a communications challenge as…

British doctors working on ‘warm’ liver transplants

British surgeons said Friday they have performed successful liver transplants on two patients using a revolutionary technique which keeps the organ warm and functioning while outside the body. The team, working at King’s College Hospital in London, say the procedure could significantly increase the number of organs available for transplant.…

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day: This is how science describes a hangover

With St. Patrick’s Day coming up on Sunday, now’s a good time to rethink the traditional approach to the Irish high holiday and give a second look at what all that boozing really does to your body. The best tips from a recent post to the Bytesize Science YouTube channel:…

CDC: Organ transplant infected patient who died from rabies

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced Friday morning that a Maryland patient who died of rabies caught the disease by way of a 2011 organ transplant, not by an animal bite. According to CBS News, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene began investigating the case after…

Medieval ‘Black Death’ skeletons found under London railroad site

Workers building a new railway in London have unearthed 13 skeletons thought to be victims of the Black Death plague that swept through Europe in the 14th century, archaeologists said on Friday. The remains were dug up at Charterhouse Square in central London during excavation work for the city’s £15…

Scientists: HIV can be ‘functionally cured’ by early treatment

French scientists announced on Friday that 14 adults who were infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS, were “functionally cured” of the infection by early treatment. According to Reuters, a team at Paris Descartes University followed patients who were administered anti-HIV medicines rapidly after infection…

Watch: Neil deGrasse Tyson explains the timelessness of photons

In video uploaded to YouTube on Thursday, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson explained why particles of light called photons existed outside of time. You should know that if you study [The Theory of Relativity] that as you increase your speed, time ticks more slowly for you than it does for anyone…

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