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Government announces opening of Atlantic coast for offshore wind farms

Department of the interior will offer lease sales on areas off coasts of Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Virginia The Obama administration has for the first time opened up large areas off the Atlantic Coast for offshore wind farms. The department of the interior said it was proposing to offer competitive…

Oil dispersants make spills 52 times more toxic, researchers say

While oil spills can cause severe environmental damage to the organisms living in the affected waters, the consequences of using oil dispersants to rectify the spill can make the situation even worse, according to a study published in the journal Environmental Pollution, reported NBCNews.com. The study found that the mixture…

Supreme Court will hear arguments on breast cancer gene patent

The Supreme Court announced that it will hear arguments next year regarding patents on breast and ovarian cancer genes, according to the ACLU, which brought the lawsuit with the Public Patent Foundation. The suit claims that genes are “products of nature” and so cannot be patented by the Utah-based Myriad…

The private life of Charles Darwin

When not busy pioneering his theory of natural selection, Darwin also applied scientific logic to courting the female of the species There are few books that provide a better insight into genius than Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species. Not only does it give a powerful sense of the…

Robot companion to keep Japan’s astronaut company on 6-month mission

A small humanoid robot that can talk will be sent into space to provide conversational company for a Japanese astronaut on a six-month mission, according to new plans. The miniature robot will arrive at the International Space Station next summer, a few months ahead of astronaut Koichi Wakata, Japan’s Kibo…

Large ice deposits found on planet nearest the sun: NASA

WASHINGTON — Scientists Thursday announced new evidence that Mercury, the planet orbiting nearest the Sun, hosts massive caches of ice and revealed new information on how water reached our solar system’s inner planets. “The new data indicate the water ice in Mercury’s polar regions, if spread over an area the…

Definitive study links polar ice cap melting to climate change

The melting of polar ice caps raised sea levels by nearly half an inch (11 millimeters) over the last two decades, scientists said Thursday, calling it the most definitive measure yet of the impact of climate change. There have been more than 30 previous estimates of whether and how much…

Johnson & Johnson won’t enforce anti-AIDS drug patents in developing world

Pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson announced Thursday that it would not enforce its patents on its AIDS drug Prezista in the world’s poorest countries and throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Offering cost relief to people infected with the HIV virus, J&J said it wanted to assure manufacturers that they can freely produce…

New liquid nitrogen lamp recreates weather inside your home

Swiss designers Micasa Lab have created a swirling liquid-nitrogen weather device to enjoy in the comfort of your own home Following the roaring success of the Barbican’s Rain Room installation, you can now recreate the weather in your own home, thanks to a new lamp by experimental Swiss design studio, Micasa Lab.…

Scientists record most powerful quasar blast ever

US astronomers have detected the most powerful blast from a quasar ever recorded, offering the first proof of important theories about why the universe is shaped the way it is. The beam of energy, detected by the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, based in Chile, was at least five…

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