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EPA announces new rules for auto emissions, sulfur in gasoline

US regulators announced on Friday stricter rules on vehicle emissions and a requirement for low-sulfur gasoline as part of President Barack Obama’s efforts to reduce pollution. The Environmental Protection Agency’s proposal would require a 60 percent reduction in sulfur in gasoline as well as stricter tailpipe emissions standards for cars…

Scientists plan diving quest to study ‘living fossil’ coelacanth

French and South African biologists will dive to deep-sea caves in the Indian Ocean next month in a bid to locate the coelacanth, the “living fossil” fish whose history predates the dinosaurs, France’s National Museum of Natural History said on Friday. The “Gombessa” expedition, named after a local term for…

Major study finds no link between vaccines and autism

A US study out Friday sought to dispel the fears of about one third of American parents that giving a series of vaccines to children may be linked to autism. Even though children are receiving more vaccines today than they did in the 1990s, there is no link between “too…

New coronavirus is potentially more deadly than SARS

Researchers from the University of Hong Kong warned that a new coronavirus that has emerged from the Middle East has the potential to be deadlier than the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus, which kiled 774 people between 2002 and 2003. The Global Post reported Friday that the University of…

Scientists use biological tissue to recreate main computer component inside E coli bacteria

Stanford researchers demonstrate ‘transcriptors’ inside E coli bacteria, in advance in synthetic biology Scientists have used biological tissue to recreate one of the main components of a modern computer inside living cells. The biological device behaves like a transistor, one of the tiny switches that are etched on to microchips…

Neil deGrasse Tyson channels John Lennon: All we are saying is give math a chance

Thursday on StarTalk Radio, Neil deGrasse Tyson explained what prompted him to pursue a career in astrophysics and implored others to “give math a chance.” “I was fortunate because my parents… took us around, we grew up in New York City, to all of the cultural institutions that showed adults…

Three astronauts blast off on fastest ride to the International Space Station

A crew of two Russians and an American blasted off Friday on a Russian rocket for the International Space Station, in a trip scheduled to be the fastest ever manned journey to the facility. The trio successfully launched from Russia’s Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, with a journey time expected to…

Study: Archeologists find remains of human-Neanderthal hybrid

Researchers believe they have pinpointed the skeletal remains of the first known human-Neanderthal hybrid, according to a study published Wednesday in the peer reviewed scientific journal PLoS ONE. The finding comes from northern Italy, where some 40,000 years ago scientists believe Neanderthals and humans lived near each other, but developed separate…

British scientists develop ‘holy grail’ vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease

British scientists have developed a “holy grail” vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease that is safer and more resilient than current vaccines, according to an article published in journal PLOS pathogens Wednesday. At the moment, animals are given a small dose of live infectious virus to stimulate the body’s immune system into…

Transfer of gut bacteria could lead to ‘knifeless gastric bypass’

Taking the right mix of bacteria could lead to a form of “knifeless gastric bypass,” a surgery-free method of causing the kind of significant weight loss associated with procedures that reduce the size of the stomach. According to New Scientist magazine, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston have been…

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