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Scientists: Food calorie count labels are often inaccurate

Dieters who eat high-fibre foods consume more calories than they think because retailers’ calorie count system is out of date The calorie content of some types of food has been systematically underestimated by retailers using a system for assessing food energy that is out of date and has not kept…

Scientists ‘on the threshold’ of major dark matter discovery

For decades, the strange substance called dark matter has teased physicists, challenging conventional notions of the cosmos. Today, though, scientists believe that with the help of multi-billion-dollar tools, they are closer than ever to piercing the mystery — and the first clues may be unveiled just weeks from now. “We…

Russian scientists say they have recovered meteor fragments

Scientists said Monday they had discovered fragments of the meteor that spectacularly plunged over Russia’s Ural Mountains creating a shockwave that injured 1,200 people and damaged thousands of homes. The giant piece of space rock streaked over the city of Chelyabinsk in central Russia on Friday with the force of…

Study: Female governors talk more about welfare policy

Female governors bring more attention to welfare policy than their male colleagues, according to research published Friday in State and Local Government Review. “Consistent with much of the research on the influence of gender on the behavior of legislators, gender appears to affect the policy priorities of governors,” Brianne Heidbreder…

Sale of personal gene data condemned as ‘unethical and dangerous’

Critics say companies could acquire personal information that would identify NHS patients without their consent Private firms will soon be able to buy people’s medical and genetic data without their consent and, in certain cases, acquire personal information that might enable them to identify individuals. The revelation, which contradicts government…

Multiparton interactions at the Large Hadron Collider

Away from the high-profile Higgs hunting, a new paper sheds some light on the complex inner life of the proton, and how it affects results from CERN’s LHC For most of the past two years, before it stopped last week for a while, the LHC was making protons collide head…

Ancient mysteries unveiled at Peru’s 5,000-year-old Temple of Fire

The recent discovery of a ceremonial fireplace believed to be more than 5,000 years old sheds light on one of the oldest populated sites in the Americas. The fireplace, dubbed the Temple of Fire, was discovered within the El Paraiso archeological complex in the Chillon valley, located just outside the…

Scientists look at restoring lakes damaged by Hurricane Sandy

Scientists look at restoring lakes damaged by Hurricane Sandy (via NJ.com) WEST LONG BRANCH — Once a natural inlet that closed over time, Wreck Pond in Monmouth County was one in a long line of Hurricane Sandy’s casualties, its eastern edge ripped open and exposed to the ocean. But to…

Study: In vitro fertilization does not increase risk of breast cancer

A new study has found that in-vitro fertilization (IVF) does not increase a woman’s risk of contracting breast or endometrial cancer. According to Reuters, researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) examined the medical records of 67,608 Israeli women who received IVF treatments between 1994 and 2011 and compared them…

Scientists crafting new asteroid-detection systems after ‘cosmic coincidence’

Science editor Robin McKie reports from Boston as experts create warning systems to minimize risk from impact The extraterrestrial double whammy that Earth only partially avoided on Friday has triggered an immediate response from astronomers. Several have announced plans to create state-of-the-art detection systems to give warning of incoming asteroids…

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