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Richard III’s scarred skeleton becomes a battlefield for academics

As in 1485, once the death of the king was confirmed, the arguments started. Was the search for the man in the car park a stunt and a media circus, or a classic piece of research archaeology based on sound science, which opens a window on a period of history…

Study debunks notion that men and women are psychologically distinct

A first-of-its-kind study to be published in the February issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology has dealt a devastating blow to the notion that men and women are fundamentally different when it comes to how they think and act. “Although gender differences on average are not under…

Gene therapy in mice gives hope to the deaf

Scientists using gene therapy have partially restored hearing and balance in profoundly deaf mice, according to a study published on Monday in the journal Nature Medicine. The research, still in its early stages and restricted to lab animals, may open up new avenues for tackling Usher syndrome, an inherited form…

Most promising vaccine to replace TB jab doesn’t protect against the disease

PARIS — The most promising vaccine to replace the world’s 91-year-old tuberculosis jab does not protect against the disease, according to results released Monday of large-scale trials conducted among infants in South Africa. Doctors have had high hopes for the formula, known as MVA85A, as the existing Bacille-Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine…

Team recreating Shackleton’s 1916 Antarctic trip makes landfall

An exhausted British-Australian expedition recreating Ernest Shackleton’s 1916 crossing of the Southern Ocean in a small boat made landfall after a perilous 12-day journey. Led by renowned adventurer Tim Jarvis, the team of six reached Peggotty Bluff on rugged South Georgia, where they landed their vessel in the same place…

Confirmed: Richard III’s skull and skeleton found in British parking garage

British archaelogists hunting for the lost remains of King Richard III on Monday revealed the first image of a battle-scarred skull found at a car park ahead of what they said would be a “major announcement” about their findings. More than five centuries after the mediaeval king was killed in…

Fearless brain-damaged patients are terrified of suffocation: study

People who lack a brain structure thought to be critical for fear can still experience the emotion The patient known as S.M. has not experienced fear since she was a child, and has fascinated brain researchers for many years. Several years ago, one team noted that she makes risky financial…

The bacterium that lays tiny nuggets of gold

Among the more peculiar organisms that inhabit our Earth exists a bacterium that turns water-soluble gold into microscopic nuggets of solid gold, scientists said Sunday. Chemists have often pondered why the germ Delftia acidovorans is frequently found on the surface of tiny gold nuggets. Its presence led scientists to speculate…

Jared Diamond in controversy over claim tribal peoples live in ‘state of constant war’

Respected author’s book condemned by Survival International as ‘completely wrong, both factually and morally’ A fierce dispute has erupted between Pulitzer prize-winning author Jared Diamond and campaign group Survival International over Diamond’s recently published and highly acclaimed comparison of western and tribal societies, The World Until Yesterday: What Can We…

After 30 years, is a GM food breakthrough finally here?

Golden rice, a new strain that boosts vitamin A levels and reduces blindness in developing countries, is about to be sown in the Philippines – and is the new battleground crop Scientists say they have seen the future of genetically modified foods and have concluded that it is orange or,…

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