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U.S. regulators approve bionic eye

U.S. regulators approved a so-called bionic eye, giving hope to people with a rare genetic disease. Developed by California-based Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System is the first retinal implant for adults with advanced retinitis pigmentosa that results in the gradual loss of vision and…

Over 250 injured in meteor strike above central Russia

Over 250 people were injured when a meteor burned up above the central Russian city of Chelyabinsk, unleashing a shock wave that shattered panes of glass, the interior ministry said. “Over 250 people were injured, three of them seriously,” the interior ministry said in a statement to Russian news agencies,…

Medical experts advise flatulent flyers: Let it rip mid-flight

A group of medical specialists has provided an answer to a dilemma that has faced flyers since the Wright brothers took to the air in 1903 — is it okay to fart mid-flight? The experts’ recommendation is an emphatic yes to airline passengers — but a warning to cockpit crews…

Research confirms source of mysterious cosmic rays

Cosmic rays — fast-moving particles that constantly pummel our planet — come from the explosion of supernovae, new research confirmed Thursday, resolving an astronomical mystery. Protons make up 90 percent of these rays that pelt Earth’s atmosphere and were discovered a century ago by the Austrian-born physicist Victor Franz Hess.…

One in five reptile species in danger of extinction

Almost one in five of the world’s reptile species are in danger of extinction as their habitats are cleared away for farming and logging, a report said Friday. An assessment by more than 200 experts of 1,500 randomly-selected species of snakes, lizards, crocodiles, tortoises and other reptiles, found that 19…

Anti-anxiety drug pollution makes fish fearless and antisocial

Anti-anxiety drugs find their way into wastewater where they make fish more fearless and antisocial, with potentially serious ecological consequences, researchers said Thursday. Scientists examining perch exposed to the sedative Oxazepam — which, like many medications, passes through the human body — found that it made them more likely to…

CDC: Increased emergency contraception use highlights importance of access

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)’s National Center for Health Statistics has issued two new reports about contraceptive use among U.S. women. Not only did the organization find that use of emergency contraception has increased, but that 99 percent of sexually active American women have used birth control of some…

Secret funding network pushed climate change denialism, opposed environmental regulations

Anonymous billionaires donated $120m to more than 100 anti-climate groups working to discredit climate change science Conservative billionaires used a secretive funding route to channel nearly $120m (£77m) to more than 100 groups casting doubt about the science behind climate change, the Guardian has learned. The funds, doled out between…

UK doctors ‘chill out’ newborn to save his life

Physicians at University College Hospital of London used an unusual treatment to save a newborn baby boy whose heart was galloping out of control at nearly double the normal heart rate for newborns. On Tuesday, the New York Daily News reported that Edward Ives, now six months old, was “frozen”…

Fewer men leads to more babies in poor areas: Study

Women who outnumber men in poor communities are likelier to have babies at a younger age as competition drives them to lower their expectations of the opposite sex, a British study said on Wednesday. The findings are a useful tool for understanding unwanted teen pregnancies, its authors believe. Researchers at…

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