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Ebola outbreak ‘kills 32′ in Congo since May

An outbreak of Ebola fever in the Democratic Republic of Congo may have claimed up to 32 lives since May, including that of a woman who had just given birth, the World Health Organisation said Tuesday. By September 15, “a cumulative total of 72 cases was recorded, including 14 cases…

Doctors perform first mother-to-daughter uterus transplants

Two Swedish women received new uteruses at the weekend in the world’s first mother-to-daughter uterine transplants aimed at helping them have babies, Gothenburg University announced on Tuesday. Uterine transplants are new, with the first successful one conducted in Turkey in 2011. “One of the women had previously had her own…

Brain project predicts connections between neurons

WASHINGTON — Researchers said Monday a new computerized model of part of a rat’s cortex predicts connections between neurons, which could help explain how the brains of mammals — including humans — work. “This is a major breakthrough because it would otherwise take decades, if not centuries, to map the…

Arctic expert predicts final collapse of sea ice within four years

One of the world’s leading ice experts has predicted the final collapse of Arctic sea ice in summer months within four years. In what he calls a “global disaster” now unfolding in northern latitudes as the sea area that freezes and melts each year shrinks to its lowest extent ever…

Weather woes delay space shuttle Endeavor’s transfer

Bad weather is delaying the transfer of the shuttle Endeavor from Florida to California where it will be put on show, the US space agency said. Endeavor, which completed its final mission last year, was scheduled to leave the Kennedy Space Center on the back of a modified Boeing 747…

Many mysteries remain as Alzheimer’s epidemic looms

More than 100 years after it was first caught in the act of decaying a patient’s brain, Alzheimer’s remains one of medicine’s greatest challenges as it robs ever more people of their memory and independence. Researchers make halting progress, reporting small steps forward along with many frustrating setbacks. And while…

How technology is helping people with speech impairments to talk

I am sitting staring at a computer screen. So far so banal, except that this screen features a red dot that, by some technological magic, tracks the movement of my eyes: I can place it where I want on the screen just by looking. The bottom of the screen portrays…

Japanese invention could end tooth decay

Scientists in Japan have created a microscopically thin film that can coat individual teeth to prevent decay or to make them appear whiter, the chief researcher said. The “tooth patch” is a hard-wearing and ultra-flexible material made from hydroxyapatite, the main mineral in tooth enamel, that could also mean an…

Bee study reveals ‘hunter-gatherer’ and ‘nurturing’ roles in hives

Experiments on division of labour among honeybees reveal why some worker bees are foragers while others nurse their queens Experiments on the division of labour in honeybee hives have revealed why some bees do the waggle dance while others nurse their queens. The roles require drastically different behaviours, with nurses…

How artificial intelligence is changing our lives

How artificial intelligence is changing our lives In Silicon Valley, Nikolas Janin rises for his 40-minute commute to work just like everyone else. The shop manager and fleet technician at Google gets dressed and heads out to his Lexus RX 450h for the trip on California’s clotted freeways. That’s when…

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