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Study: Chemicals in baby soaps can trigger marijuana-positive drug tests

A study (PDF) featured in the June 2012 print edition of the medical journal Clinical Biochemistry claims that tiny traces of certain baby soaps and shampoos can trigger drug test results showing the presence of marijuana, which can in some cases cause state authorities to remove a child from parental…

Studies suggest that microbes can control our minds

An increasing amount of evidence is coming to light suggesting that human moods, emotions and perceptions can be influenced by the type and number of microscopic life forms inhabiting our gut, according to an article in Scientific American magazine. Scientists say a time may even come when we treat mental…

Night shifts may increase breast cancer risk by 30 percent

Night work may increase a woman’s chances of developing breast cancer by 30 percent — a slightly elevated but “statistically significant” risk, French researchers said Tuesday. This placed night work in the same order of risk as factors like genetic mutation, a late first pregnancy or hormonal treatment, Pascal Guenel,…

Study: World faces food crisis if American weight-gain trends spread

If the human race keeps growing fatter at American rates, the Earth may face a rise in food demand equal to that of nearly a billion extra people, British researchers warned on Monday. Expanding waistlines in the rich world pose a grave threat to our planet’s finite resources, said the…

Study finds medical marijuana has no impact on teen drug abuse

A working paper published Monday (PDF) claims that, despite the insistence of numerous U.S. officials, legalizing medical marijuana had no distinguishable effect on teen drug abuse rates in the surrounding communities. Drawing upon data from 13 states from 1993 – 2009, professors from Montana State University, the University of Oregon and…

Scientists use touch-screen computers to catch bears ‘counting’

It appears that U.S. political pundit Stephen Colbert was right to be worried about the rising threat posed by your run-of-the-mill bears: As it turns out, they’re much smarter than previously thought. A study published earlier this month in the scientific journal Animal Behaviour revealed, for the first time ever,…

62 years later, passing the ‘Turing test’ remains elusive

It is 100 years this week since the birth of the revered wartime codebreaker Alan Turing, and 67 years since he was awarded an OBE for leading the team, in Bletchley Park’s Hut 8, that cracked the German navy’s Enigma code. It has also now been 60 years since he…

Massive mushroom cloud rises over Beijing skyline

A giant mushroom-like cloud resembling an atomic bomb explosion and sparking fears of Armageddon appeared in Beijing last week. The most likely explanation was a weather phenomenon known as a giant cumulonimbus, a tall and dense vertical cloud that is associated with thunder storms, according to The Daily Mail. The…

75 percent of Britons with mental illness go untreated

Three out of four people with mental illness in the UK are receiving no treatment, experts have said in a new report. The report, published by the London School of Economics (LSE), says the lack of treatment for people suffering from mental health problems is the most “glaring case of…

UK authorities: Faulty French breast implants don’t increase cancer risk

Faulty breast implants made by PIP, the French company that sparked a global health scare, do not pose any long-term medical threats, British health authorities said in a final report Monday. The silicone gel filler used inside the implants is not toxic and does not increase the risk of breast…

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