Quantcast
Home » Archives » Science (Page 311)

Wider letter spacing helps dyslexics read: study

WASHINGTON — European researchers said Monday that offering reading materials with wider spacing between the letters can help dyslexic children read faster and better. In a sample of dyslexic children age eight to 14, extra-wide letter spacing doubled accuracy and increased reading speed by more than 20 percent, according to…

Military gives NASA two space telescopes more powerful than Hubble

Although America’s space agency has perpetually seen its funding threatened and reduced in recent years, few would argue that the nation’s defense agency, the Pentagon, suffers from the same problem. That disparity is so great that Pentagon official dialed up NASA last year and revealed that the National Reconnaissance Office had secretly…

Asia witnesses partial lunar eclipse

The first partial lunar eclipse of the year provided dramatic scenes across Asia late Monday, with a clear moon visible to many as the event unfolded. While Australia and the east of Japan watched as the Earth slid between the Moon and the Sun, casting a grey shadow over the…

Controversial stem cell treatments bring hope after early human trials

Marcus Hilton sits in front of the TV and stares at the Sky News headlines scrolling along the bottom of the screen. If he moves his head about, he can find the little patch of vision in his right eye where letters jump from a tiny size to suddenly bigger.…

Research shows promising treatments against skin cancer

Two new experimental treatments against advanced melanoma have shown promise in keeping the deadly skin cancer at bay, according to research presented in the United States on Monday. The agents, known as Dabrafenib and Trametinib, are being developed by the British pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline, and were tested in clinical trials against standard chemotherapy treatments. The…

Study finds Stone Age artists were the first animators

A French archaeologist and an artist who have studied Stone Age cave art for twenty years say that many of the drawings were intended to produce an illusion of movement. According to Marc Azéma and Florent Rivère, viewing the scenes by flickering torchlight would have been just one of the…

Transit of Venus: Your last chance to see it before 2117

A small black dot will grace the face of the sun as it rises (over Europe) on Wednesday, when Venus makes a rare and historic journey across the burning disc of our parent star. Few people alive today will have another chance to witness the transit of Venus, as the…

The final frontier? Trillion-dollar plan to build Starship Enterprise

Engineer unveils detailed proposals for building spaceship from original Star Trek series over two decades, at a cost of £648bn In its time, the original Star Trek series has inspired many inventions – the flip-open mobile phone (based on the crew’s communicators), handheld medical diagnostics (based on its tricorder) –…

Race to map Africa’s forgotten glaciers before they melt away

A team of scientists and photographers aims to document the Earth’s fading glaciers Ptolemy thought they were the source of the Nile and called them the Mountains of the Moon because of the perpetual mists that covered them; Stanley claimed to be the first non-African to see their icecap; and…

Experimental drug keeps aggressive breast cancer at bay

An experimental drug treatment may help keep a certain kind of aggressive breast cancer at bay, offering new hope for individual therapies against difficult tumors, said research released Sunday. The phase III trial comparing trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) to standard therapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 positive) breast…

Google+