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‘Smart e-Pants’ underwear deliver electric shocks to comatose patients to prevent bed sores

Scientists have developed underwear with built-in electrodes that deliver small electric shocks to combat bed sores in patients who are in a coma or who have injuries that have immobilised them. At the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in New Orleans on Monday, they reported results from a trial of the “Smart-e-Pants” system, a…

Controversial U.S. businessman’s geoengineering scheme violates two UN conventions: investigation

A controversial American businessman dumped around 100 tonnes of iron sulphate into the Pacific Ocean as part of a geoengineering scheme off the west coast of Canada in July, a Guardian investigation can reveal. Lawyers, environmentalists and civil society groups are calling it a “blatant violation” of two international moratoria…

Madagascar lemurs top endangered primates list

In the hit cartoon film “Madagascar”, the island’s lemurs are a lovable bunch of extroverts, but they are also among the world’s most threatened primates, conservationists warned on Monday. A report released at the UN’s Convention on Biological Diversity meeting in the Indian city of Hyderabad said lemurs in Madagascar,…

Bones under car park hold key to Richard III

Archaeologists and one hopeful relative are anxiously waiting to see if a skeleton dug up from a hole in a car park in Leicester is the remains of the much-maligned King Richard III. More than five centuries after he was killed in the Battle of Bosworth Field by the armies…

Study reveals ADHD children’s views on drugs, doctors

New research finds that children with disorder are concerned that doctors do not understand the condition Children with hyperactivity problems do not feel that Ritalin and other drugs they are given turn them into zombies or robots, but say they feel the medication helps them control their behaviour, according to…

New comet likely to impress when it passes closest to Earth in December

A comet found recently beyond the orbit of Jupiter could well become spectacular late next year and may be a sibling of one of the most celebrated comets of all time. What is formally known as Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was not at first recognised as a comet when it…

Research: High-status people more readily return smiles of low-status people

People who feel powerful are more likely to return smiles of those they see as low status, according to study If you smile at your boss and she smiles back, beware. It could be a sign that she does not think too highly of you, according to a study. People…

Study: Moon water may come indirectly from the sun

Scientists on Sunday said they had found water molecules in samples of lunar soil, and their unusual signature points to the Sun as the indirect source. Samples returned to Earth by the Apollo missions carry molecules of water and a precursor of water called hydroxyl, according to their study, published…

Butterfly pioneer laments threat to species

Chen Wei-shou, the pioneer of Taiwan butterfly research, remembers being spell-bound when as a boy of six he first saw “a flower that could move”. A life-long obsession had begun. Now aged 81, Chen can look back at a long career which has spanned seven decades, 77 books and has…

‘Love hormone’ eases cravings in alcoholics

Nasally-administered doses of oxytocin, also known as the “love hormone,” have been shown to ease the urgent cravings experienced by alcoholics who are trying to quit drinking. According to New Scientist, a team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, led by Dr. Court Pederson, treated…

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