Quantcast
Home » Archives » Science (Page 318)

Zombie honeybees discovered in Washington state

A novice beekeeper in Washington state said this week that he’s found evidence that a parasite which takes control of honeybees much like an imagined “zombie” virus is spreading into new areas, according to The Seattle Times. The so called zombie bees, or “zombees” for short, are created by a…

A third of Europe’s urban population exposed to air pollution

Nearly a third of Europe’s urban population is exposed to air particles that breach European Union limits, an official report said Monday. The figure more than triples if a UN health benchmark is used. In 2010, 21 percent of residents of European towns and cities breathed air with concentrations of…

Health experts identify Sars-like virus in London

Health experts are trying to identify a new Sars-like virus that is so far known to have infected two people, one of whom is receiving intensive care in a London hospital. A 49-year-old Qatari man was transported by air ambulance from Doha almost two weeks ago. The other person, a 60-year-old man,…

Congo conflict puts endangered mountain gorillas in peril

Home to the famed mountain gorillas, Africa’s oldest national park in the Democratic Republic of Congo has been overrun by armed groups who have slaughtered wildlife and scared off much-needed tourists. For Belgian park director Emmanuel de Merode and his staff it is a time of great uncertainty and anxiety.…

In half century, Brazil lost 80% of coral reef: study

In just five decades, Brazil has lost 80 percent of the coral reef once found along 3,000 kilometers (1,864 miles) of its northeastern coast, according to a study cited by local media Sunday. Brazil’s reef ecosystems — with 18 species of coral, algae and at least three types of fish…

New studies confirm that consuming sugary drinks is one cause of childhood obesity

Three new studies published in the United States this weekend reaffirm a link between sweet soda and fruit drinks to an epidemic of obesity that is sweeping the US. Consumption of these drinks has more than doubled since the 1970s, and the rate of obesity among Americans during the same…

Scientists say carbon taxes favor wealthy countries’ consumers over poor countries’ producers

Calls for carbon taxes to tackle global warming often dodge the complexity of this issue, with the risk that hasty action could damage the world economy and fuel the greenhouse-gas problem, experts warned on Sunday. Carbon taxes — levies that would be imposed on goods according to the carbon dioxide…

Thousands gather in Belgium for climate change sing-a-long

Thousands of Belgians both north and south of the Flemish-French language divide joined a weekend singalong to fight climate change, with organisers claiming more than 60,000 people took part. The weekend “Sing for the Climate” event aimed to film as many people as possible singing the same song in scores…

Discovery: Humans hunted for meat 1.6 million years earlier than previously thought

Evidence from ancient butchery site in Tanzania shows early man was capable of ambushing herds up to 1.6 million years earlier than previously thought Ancient humans used complex hunting techniques to ambush and kill antelopes, gazelles, wildebeest and other large animals at least two million years ago. The discovery –…

Was Isaac Newton a scientist or a sorcerer? Or both?

Isaac Newton’s belief in spirits and alchemy may have been essential to achieving his towering scientific achievement: gravity Hot on the heels of Isaac Newton’s apple appearing at the Paralympics comes a new celebration of his life and achievements. The Gravity Fields Festival begins on Friday in Grantham, Lincolnshire. For…

Google+