Quantcast
Home » Archives » Science (Page 321)

New studies confirm that consuming sugary drinks is one cause of childhood obesity

Three new studies published in the United States this weekend reaffirm a link between sweet soda and fruit drinks to an epidemic of obesity that is sweeping the US. Consumption of these drinks has more than doubled since the 1970s, and the rate of obesity among Americans during the same…

Scientists say carbon taxes favor wealthy countries’ consumers over poor countries’ producers

Calls for carbon taxes to tackle global warming often dodge the complexity of this issue, with the risk that hasty action could damage the world economy and fuel the greenhouse-gas problem, experts warned on Sunday. Carbon taxes — levies that would be imposed on goods according to the carbon dioxide…

Thousands gather in Belgium for climate change sing-a-long

Thousands of Belgians both north and south of the Flemish-French language divide joined a weekend singalong to fight climate change, with organisers claiming more than 60,000 people took part. The weekend “Sing for the Climate” event aimed to film as many people as possible singing the same song in scores…

Discovery: Humans hunted for meat 1.6 million years earlier than previously thought

Evidence from ancient butchery site in Tanzania shows early man was capable of ambushing herds up to 1.6 million years earlier than previously thought Ancient humans used complex hunting techniques to ambush and kill antelopes, gazelles, wildebeest and other large animals at least two million years ago. The discovery –…

Was Isaac Newton a scientist or a sorcerer? Or both?

Isaac Newton’s belief in spirits and alchemy may have been essential to achieving his towering scientific achievement: gravity Hot on the heels of Isaac Newton’s apple appearing at the Paralympics comes a new celebration of his life and achievements. The Gravity Fields Festival begins on Friday in Grantham, Lincolnshire. For…

From inside the chrysalis to epic migration: ‘Flight of the Butterflies’ revealed in 3D

Documentary that captures butterfly’s extraordinary 2,000-mile trek across North America to Mexico is tipped to be next smash hit nature film The extraordinary 2,000-mile journey made by millions of butterflies each autumn from Canada, through the USA to Mexico is revealed in minute detail for the first time in a…

Swine flu vaccine linked to child narcolepsy

A swine flu vaccine used in 2009-10 is linked to a higher risk of the sleeping disorder narcolepsy in children and teens in Sweden and Finland, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control said Friday. The EU agency studied the effects of the Pandemrix vaccine on children in eight…

Africa’s Khoe-San were first to split from other humans

Southern Africa’s bushmen, and their relatives the Khoe, veered off on their own path of genetic development 100,000 years ago, according to a new study this week. The split, gleaned from an analysis of genetic data, is the earliest divergence scientists have discovered in the evolution of modern humans. The…

‘Astronomical Unit’ officially adopted by astronomers

The world’s top astronomical body has endorsed the definition of the “Astronomical Unit” (AU), a measurement used to calculate the distance between stars and planets. The AU — based on the distance between Earth and the Sun — has long been in use by astronomers, and the decision by the…

This year’s Ig Nobel awards: Researchers monitor a dead salmon’s ‘brain activity’

When a team of scientists decided to work out the complex mathematics that control the shape and movement of a human ponytail, they had not set their sights on fame or glory. On Thursday, however, the British-American team behind the work were celebrated as this year’s laureates for the Ig…

Google+