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U.S. drought could trigger global food crisis

America’s drought threatens a recurrence of the 2008 global food crisis, when soaring prices set off riots and unrest to parts of Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America, food experts warn. Corn prices reached an all-time high on Friday, as the drought expanded across America, trading at $8.24 a…

Researchers: HIV drug resistance growing in Africa

Resistance to AIDS drugs, a problem that has been widely feared over the last decade, is growing in parts of Africa but should not hamper the life-saving drug rollout, researchers reported on Monday. Tiny genetic mutations that make HIV immune to key frontline drugs have been increasing in eastern and…

Research: Climate change drives rise in food poisoning

Research published Sunday in the scientific journal Nature Climate Change claims that warning sea levels in the Baltic Sea are strongly linked to recent blooms of the Vibrios bacteria group, which have corresponded with an uptick in humans reporting foodborne illnesses in northern Europe. And while the study notes that…

Lab-engineered jellyfish may mend a broken heart

Using cells from rat hearts and a seer polymer film, scientists reported they had created an artificial jellyfish that could one day help save patients with heart disease. The exploit marks an advance in so-called biomimicry, in which a natural wonder inspires copycat innovation in the lab. The interest in…

Expert: ‘No excuse’ for saying we can’t turn the tide on AIDS

Science has given the world “no excuse” to resist bold action against the spread of the 30-year AIDS pandemic, said a top US expert at the opening of the International AIDS Conference on Sunday. This year’s meeting, themed “Turning the Tide Together,” is the world’s largest gathering on HIV/AIDS and…

Arctic wilderness faces pollution threats as oil and gas giants target its riches

Melting ice caps, the influx of trawlers and tourists, and Shell’s £4bn investment to drill for fossil fuels in the Chukchi Sea all raise fears It is home to a quarter of the planet’s oil and natural gas reserves, yet humans have hardly touched these resources in the far north.…

Hypnosis enjoys a revival

Long derided as a tool of quacks and comedians, the science of suggestibility is enjoying a revival as a clinical tool, says Vaughan Bell Hypnosis is the eccentric uncle of cognitive science. It was once part of the mainstream – studied by scientists and clinicians alike in its 1960s heyday…

Stanford scientists design first virtual organism

A team of scientists at Stanford University has created the first computer model of an organism, NBC News reports. The model was based off of a microbe, Mycoplasma genitalium, that causes sexually transmitted diseases. Though it only contains 525 genes – a human being, by comparison, has more than 20,000…

Sex workers denied U.S. visa hold their own AIDS conference

Hundreds of sex workers from around the world who said they were denied visas to attend an international AIDS conference in the United States began their own meeting in Kolkata on Saturday in protest. Some 550 representatives of sex workers from India and 41 other countries were attending the seven-day…

Archaeologists believe the Mediterranean diet came to Britain during the Iron Age

Iron Age Britons were importing olives from the Mediterranean a century before the Romans arrived with their exotic tastes in food, say archaeologists who have discovered a single olive stone from an excavation of an Iron Age well at at Silchester in Hampshire. The stone came from a layer securely…

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