Quantcast
Home » Archives » Science (Page 336)

Intense heart attack pain could actually help patients, researchers say

Scientists say that when morphine is used to relieve pain it blocks the healing work of stem cells The intense pain of a heart attack could actually help patients, researchers have discovered. They have found that during an attack – when a blood clot blocks an artery that is serving…

Light brings back bad memories: study

Memory is one of the enduring mysteries of neuroscience. How does the brain form a memory, store it, and then retrieve it later on? After a century of research, some answers began to emerge. It is now widely believed that memory formation involves the strengthening of connections between a network…

The insider’s guide to cancer prevention

These experts spend their lives fighting cancer. They have heard every tip, sensible or not, for how to avoid it. They tell Oliver Laughland how their lifestyles have changed as a result The breast specialist Tena Walters, 51, consultant, London Breast Clinic Just this week the papers splashed on another piece…

Canadian scientists discover alternative to whale vomit for perfumers

A product from fir trees and yeast may soon replace ambergris, a kind of whale barf, to make expensive perfume, scientists said Thursday. For centuries, perfume makers have prized ambergris for its ability to prevent scent from dissipating. The wax-like substance is secreted by sperm whales to protect their digestive…

Scientists warn icebergs are still a risk a century after the Titanic

We’ve painted them, tagged them, bombed them, monitored them with radar and watched them from space — but icebergs like the one that sank the Titanic are still a threat to ships today. Scientists say that despite a century of technological gains, ships rely heavily on a detection method as…

NASA scientist: climate change is a moral issue on a par with slavery

Prof Jim Hansen to use lecture at Edinburgh International Science Festival to call for worldwide tax on all carbon emissions.  Averting the worst consequences of human-induced climate change is a “great moral issue” on a par with slavery, according to the leading Nasa climate scientist Prof Jim Hansen. He argues…

Drug-resistant malaria spreading rapidly in Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand

Deadly malaria that is resistant to drug treatment has spread rapidly to the border between Thailand and Myanmar, raising concerns of an uncontrollable epidemic, scientists said Thursday. A pair of studies published in The Lancet and the journal Science showed how the disease is moving fast into new territory and…

Successful AIDS vaccine trial may be due to individuals’ existing antibody levels

The success of an AIDS vaccine trial that in 2009 was shown to protect 31 percent of people studied may have been due to varying levels of antibody responses in the patients, researchers said Thursday. Different types of antibody responses were associated with who became infected and who did not,…

TEPCO admits radioactive water recently ‘leaked’ into the Pacific from Fukushima

About 12 tonnes of radioactive water has leaked at Japan’s crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, with the facility’s operator saying Thursday that some may have flowed into the Pacific Ocean. Tokyo Electric Power Co. said the leak was found early Thursday from a pipe attached to a temporary decontamination…

British pandas dry-hump but fail to complete coitus in fertility window

Britain’s only giant pandas failed to mate during their 36-hour window of opportunity, Edinburgh Zoo said Thursday. It was “close, but no cigar”, the zoo said, after Yang Guang (Sunshine) mounted female panda Tian Tian (Sweetie) several times, without full mating taking place. The pandas are spending 10 years on…

Google+