Quantcast
Home » Archives » Science (Page 344)

Did Stone Age cavemen talk to each other in symbols?

By Robin McKie– Previously overlooked patterns in the cave art of southern France and Spain suggest man might have learned written communication 25,000 years earlier than we thought. Visit the caves of Pech Merle, Font-de-Gaume and Rouffignac in southern France and you will witness some of the most breathtaking art…

Rats as good at decision-making as humans: study

WASHINGTON — Rats are smart, that’s a well known fact. But US researchers said Tuesday a series of tests have shown they may be just as good as humans at juggling information in order to make the best decision. The discovery could help scientists better understand how the brain works…

Vaginal birth after C-section carries more risks: study

WASHINGTON — Women who had a Cesarean section for their first child’s birth face more health risks if they attempt a vaginal birth with their second, Australian researchers said Tuesday. The study included more than 2,300 women at 14 hospitals in Australia who were preparing for their second child. About…

Neil deGrasse Tyson: Partisan bickering tainted future of NASA

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson appeared Tuesday on The David Pakman Show to explain the politics of NASA and why private industries could not lead the frontier of space exploration. “NASA has always been political,” he said. “The difference is it is now partisan. That’s an important distinction. NASA was created…

Scientists: nuclear bomb could stop asteroid from striking Earth

Scientists at New Mexico’s Los Alamos National Laboratory believe that a well-aimed nuclear weapon could actually save the world if a major asteroid were hurtling toward us, according to a report at MSNBC’s Space blog. Researches have used super-computers to model scenarios involving a 1,650-foot-long (500-meter) space rock and a…

South Korean and Russian scientists join to clone woolly mammoth

Russian and South Korean scientists have signed a deal on joint research intended to recreate a woolly mammoth, an animal which last walked the earth some 10,000 years ago. The deal was signed by Vasily Vasiliev, vice rector of North-Eastern Federal University of the Sakha Republic, and controversial cloning pioneer…

Astronauts’ eyeballs deformed by long missions in space, study finds

By Ian Sample Flattening at the back of their eyes may be caused by increased pressure of cerebrospinal fluid in microgravity Brain scans of Nasa astronauts who have returned to Earth after more than a month in space have revealed potentially serious abnormalities that could jeopardise the future of long-term…

Scientist: The brain is like a computer, and we can fix it with nanorobots

by Ian Tucker Synthetic biology has the potential to replace or improve drug therapies for a wide range of brain disorders, says Ed Boyden Ed Boyden heads the Synthetic Neurobiology Group at MIT Media Lab. He is working on developing technologies and tools for “analysing and engineering brain circuits” –…

Red meat boosts risk of dying young: study

WASHINGTON — Eating a portion of processed red meat daily can boost a person’s risk of dying young by up to 20 percent, said a long-running US study of more than 120,000 people released on Monday. While the research by Harvard University experts offers more evidence that eating red meat…

Conservationist teams up with Project Runway designers to save endangered species

An entrepreneurial animal activist has recruited designers from the TV series Project Runway for a campaign to raise awareness and save 12 endangered species from extinction. “If one does not know about an animal’s existence, one cannot save it from extinction,” Cornell University veterinary student and activist Gabby Wild told…

Google+