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WHO launches action plan against ‘hidden epidemic’ of hepatitis

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced on Wednesday measures to fight the “hidden epidemic” of hepatitis which kills more than one million people a year. The virus, which settles in the liver causing inflammation, affects 500 million people worldwide but can go unnoticed for years and even decades, the UN…

Being cured of HIV is ‘wonderful,’ man says

WASHINGTON — The only person believed to have been cured of HIV infection through a bone marrow transplant said Tuesday he feels wonderful and is launching a new foundation to boost research toward a cure. Timothy Ray Brown, 47, an American from Seattle, Washington, rose to fame as the so-called…

Sunbed tanning kills 800 in Europe every year: study

PARIS — Sunbed users run a 20 percent higher risk than non-users of developing skin cancer, according to a report that blamed some 800 melanoma deaths in Europe every year on indoor tanning. About 3,400 of some 64,000 new cases of cutaneous melanoma diagnosed in 18 European countries every year…

Russian cargo ship fails to dock with space station

The Russian cargo ship Progress has failed to successfully dock with the International Space Station (ISS) during tests designed to facilitate future link-ups, the US and Russian space agencies said Tuesday. “The re-docking of the Russian ISS Progress 47 resupply spacecraft to the International Space Station has been postponed due…

U.S. drought could trigger global food crisis

America’s drought threatens a recurrence of the 2008 global food crisis, when soaring prices set off riots and unrest to parts of Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America, food experts warn. Corn prices reached an all-time high on Friday, as the drought expanded across America, trading at $8.24 a…

Researchers: HIV drug resistance growing in Africa

Resistance to AIDS drugs, a problem that has been widely feared over the last decade, is growing in parts of Africa but should not hamper the life-saving drug rollout, researchers reported on Monday. Tiny genetic mutations that make HIV immune to key frontline drugs have been increasing in eastern and…

Research: Climate change drives rise in food poisoning

Research published Sunday in the scientific journal Nature Climate Change claims that warning sea levels in the Baltic Sea are strongly linked to recent blooms of the Vibrios bacteria group, which have corresponded with an uptick in humans reporting foodborne illnesses in northern Europe. And while the study notes that…

Lab-engineered jellyfish may mend a broken heart

Using cells from rat hearts and a seer polymer film, scientists reported they had created an artificial jellyfish that could one day help save patients with heart disease. The exploit marks an advance in so-called biomimicry, in which a natural wonder inspires copycat innovation in the lab. The interest in…

Expert: ‘No excuse’ for saying we can’t turn the tide on AIDS

Science has given the world “no excuse” to resist bold action against the spread of the 30-year AIDS pandemic, said a top US expert at the opening of the International AIDS Conference on Sunday. This year’s meeting, themed “Turning the Tide Together,” is the world’s largest gathering on HIV/AIDS and…

Arctic wilderness faces pollution threats as oil and gas giants target its riches

Melting ice caps, the influx of trawlers and tourists, and Shell’s £4bn investment to drill for fossil fuels in the Chukchi Sea all raise fears It is home to a quarter of the planet’s oil and natural gas reserves, yet humans have hardly touched these resources in the far north.…

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